It's Jeremy Paxman's last night on Newsnight. Photo: Getty
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It's Jeremy Paxman's last night on Newsnight: here are his best moments

Whether he's being fierce and feisty, grumpy and grouchy, or beardy and bubbly, Jeremy Paxman is a memorable Newsnight presenter. To celebrate his last appearance on the show tonight, here are his best bits...

1. Silvio Berlusconi: "Is it true you called Angela Merkel an unfuckable lard-arse?" (2014)

Worth watching for the casual frankness with which Paxman asks the former Italian premier about the choice words he apparently used about the German chancellor:


2. Russell Brand: "Grow it longer, tangle it into your armpit hair" (2013)

A modern classic. Brand ribs Paxman about his beard, and Paxman decides his interview subject is "a very trivial man" - but it's clear he likes him really:


3. Chloe Smith: "Do you ever think you're incompetent?" (2012)

When the Chancellor sacrificed his junior minister on the altar of Newsnight for a fuel duty u-turn, it jettisoned the one-time "rising star's" burgeoning political career:

4. Conrad Black: "You are a convicted fraudster" (2012)

Paxman and the former media baron clash as he is questioned over allegations against him. "Will you stop this bourgeois priggishness?" Black spits at one point:

 

5. Boris Johnson: "Tell us how much it would cost" (2008)

Then a London Mayoral candidate, Boris refused 12 times to answer a question about buses:


6. George Galloway: "Are you proud of having got rid of one of the very few black women in parliament?" (2005)

A combative interview with the Respect MP after he famously defeated Oona King in Bethnal Green and Bow:


7. Tony Blair: "I'm just trying to explore the sort of chap you are" (2003)

Paxman goes for the then-prime minister on his "religious conviction":

8. Michael Howard: "Did you threaten to overrule him?" (1997)

Probably Paxo's most notoriously Paxman-like political interview, in which he asks the then-home secretary twelve times whether he threatened to overrule the director general of HM Prison Service.

UPDATE:

Here's what happened on Jeremy Paxman's last night:

He rode on a tandem with Boris

Not sure why.

He mocked the weather report

In an in-joke about his serial derisive attitude to having to tell us the weather, Paxman said: "Tomorrow's weather: more of the same. Don't know why they make such a fuss about it."

He asked Michael Howard ONE LAST TIME

As a nod to his infamous interview with the then-Home Secretary, in which he asked him the same question 12 times "Did you threaten to overrule him?", Howard popped up during the show, and Paxman asked "Did you?" "No, but feel free to ask me another 11 times", came the reply.


He gave one of his classic beleagured-politician put-downs

Ed Milliband is as "popular as a flatulent dog in a lift", he told us with a sneer.


He was low-key about his departure

Paxman had said he wanted "no fuss" about him leaving, but that didn't quite materialise what with the nostalgia and silliness that peppered the programme. But he signed off in an understated manner: "Thank you for watching. I hope you go on enjoying the programme. Goodnight and goodbye."

I'm a mole, innit.

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Are there “tens of thousands” who still don't have their Labour leadership ballot paper?

Word has it that swathes of eligible voters have yet to receive their ballot papers, suggesting there is still all to play for in the Labour leadership contest. But is it true?

Is there still all to play for in the Labour leadership contest?

Some party insiders believe there is, having heard whispers following the bank holiday weekend that “tens of thousands” of eligible voters have yet to receive their ballot papers.

The voting process closes next Thursday (10 September), and today (1 September) is the day the Labour party suggests you get in touch if you haven’t yet been given a chance to vote.

The impression here is that most people allowed to vote – members, registered supporters, and affiliated supporters – should have received their voting code over email, or their election pack in the post, by now, and that it begins to boil down to individual administrative problems if they’ve received neither by this point.

But many are still reporting that they haven’t yet been given a chance to vote. Even Shabana Mahmood MP, shadow chief secretary to the Treasury, still hasn’t received her voting pack, as she writes on the Staggers, warning us not to assume Jeremy Corbyn will win. What’s more, Mahmood and her team have heard anecdotally that there are still “tens of thousands” who have been approved to vote who have yet to receive their ballot papers.

It’s important to remember that Mahmood is an Yvette Cooper supporter, and is using this figure in her piece to argue that there is still all to play for in the leadership race. Also, “tens of thousands” is sufficiently vague; it doesn’t give away whether or not these mystery ballot-lacking voters would really make a difference in an election in which around half a million will be voting.

But there are others in the party who have heard similar figures.

“I know people who haven’t received [their voting details] either,” one Labour political adviser tells me. “That figure [tens of thousands] is probably accurate, but the party is being far from open with us.”

“That’s the number we’ve heard, as of Friday, the bank holiday, and today – apparently it is still that many,” says another.

A source at Labour HQ does not deny that such a high number of people are still unable to vote. They say it’s difficult to work out the exact figures of ballot papers that have yet to be sent out, but reveal that they are still likely to be, “going out in batches over the next two weeks”.

A Labour press office spokesperson confirms that papers are still being sent out, but does not give me a figure: “The process of sending out ballot papers is still under way, and people can vote online right up to the deadline on September 10th.”

The Electoral Reform Services is the independent body administrating the ballot for Labour. They are more sceptical about the “tens of thousands” figure. “Tens of thousands? Nah,” an official at the organisation tells me.

“The vast majority will have been sent an email allowing them to vote, or a pack in one or two days after that. The idea that as many as tens of thousands haven’t seems a little bit strange,” they add. “There were some last-minute membership applications, and there might be a few late postal votes, or a few individuals late to register. [But] everybody should have definitely been sent an email.”

Considering Labour’s own information to voters suggests today (1 September) is the day to begin worrying if you haven’t received your ballot yet, and the body in charge of sending out the ballots denies the figure, these “tens of thousands” are likely to be wishful thinking on the part of those in the party dreading a Corbyn victory.

Anoosh Chakelian is deputy web editor at the New Statesman.