New Statesman, Art Director (maternity cover)

Looking for an Art Director for an initial six-month contract.

The New Statesman is looking for an experienced, enthusiastic and talented Art Director for an initial six-month contract.

The ideal candidate will:

  • Be comfortable working in a fast paced environment of a weekly magazine
  • Have a keen eye for detail and drive for perfection
  • Have the ability to work under pressure effectively on multiple projects
  • Have experience of leading a team
  • Have a interest in current affairs

We are looking for someone with experience of designing across multiple platforms, both in print magazines or newspapers and online. iPad design experience would be an advantage. You should be proficient in Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator and Quark Express.

The art director is responsible for:

  • Designing front cover on a weekly basis
  • Designing and managing layouts and flat plans
  • Managing the art team and retoucher
  • Managing the art budget
  • Art directing and managing special issues and projects
  • Commissioning cartoons and illustrations
  • Offering design support to other publications within the group
  • Oversight of the New Statesman iPad app

Salary: competitive, dependent on experience.

How to apply

Please send a CV and covering letter to deputy editor Helen Lewis at helen at newstatesman.co.uk with the subject line “Art Director Application”. Please attach any supporting materials as low-res PDFs or include a link to your online portfolio. Alternatively, you can apply by post to Helen Lewis, New Statesman, 7 John Carpenter Street, EC4Y 0AN.

Please include a 300-word appraisal of the strengths and weaknesses of the design of the New Statesman magazine and website.

The deadline for applications is 1 August and the contract begins on 15 September

#Match4Lara
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#Match4Lara: Lara has found her match, but the search for mixed-race donors isn't over

A UK blood cancer charity has seen an "unprecedented spike" in donors from mixed race and ethnic minority backgrounds since the campaign started. 

Lara Casalotti, the 24-year-old known round the world for her family's race to find her a stem cell donor, has found her match. As long as all goes ahead as planned, she will undergo a transplant in March.

Casalotti was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia in December, and doctors predicted that she would need a stem cell transplant by April. As I wrote a few weeks ago, her Thai-Italian heritage was a stumbling block, both thanks to biology (successful donors tend to fit your racial profile), and the fact that mixed-race people only make up around 3 per cent of international stem cell registries. The number of non-mixed minorities is also relatively low. 

That's why Casalotti's family launched a high profile campaign in the US, Thailand, Italy and the US to encourage more people - especially those from mixed or minority backgrounds - to register. It worked: the family estimates that upwards of 20,000 people have signed up through the campaign in less than a month.

Anthony Nolan, the blood cancer charity, also reported an "unprecedented spike" of donors from black, Asian, ethcnic minority or mixed race backgrounds. At certain points in the campaign over half of those signing up were from these groups, the highest proportion ever seen by the charity. 

Interestingly, it's not particularly likely that the campaign found Casalotti her match. Patient confidentiality regulations protect the nationality and identity of the donor, but Emily Rosselli from Anthony Nolan tells me that most patients don't find their donors through individual campaigns: 

 It’s usually unlikely that an individual finds their own match through their own campaign purely because there are tens of thousands of tissue types out there and hundreds of people around the world joining donor registers every day (which currently stand at 26 million).

Though we can't know for sure, it's more likely that Casalotti's campaign will help scores of people from these backgrounds in future, as it has (and may continue to) increased donations from much-needed groups. To that end, the Match4Lara campaign is continuing: the family has said that drives and events over the next few weeks will go ahead. 

You can sign up to the registry in your country via the Match4Lara website here.

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.