New Statesman, Art Director (maternity cover)

Looking for an Art Director for an initial six-month contract.

The New Statesman is looking for an experienced, enthusiastic and talented Art Director for an initial six-month contract.

The ideal candidate will:

  • Be comfortable working in a fast paced environment of a weekly magazine
  • Have a keen eye for detail and drive for perfection
  • Have the ability to work under pressure effectively on multiple projects
  • Have experience of leading a team
  • Have a interest in current affairs

We are looking for someone with experience of designing across multiple platforms, both in print magazines or newspapers and online. iPad design experience would be an advantage. You should be proficient in Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator and Quark Express.

The art director is responsible for:

  • Designing front cover on a weekly basis
  • Designing and managing layouts and flat plans
  • Managing the art team and retoucher
  • Managing the art budget
  • Art directing and managing special issues and projects
  • Commissioning cartoons and illustrations
  • Offering design support to other publications within the group
  • Oversight of the New Statesman iPad app

Salary: competitive, dependent on experience.

How to apply

Please send a CV and covering letter to deputy editor Helen Lewis at helen at newstatesman.co.uk with the subject line “Art Director Application”. Please attach any supporting materials as low-res PDFs or include a link to your online portfolio. Alternatively, you can apply by post to Helen Lewis, New Statesman, 7 John Carpenter Street, EC4Y 0AN.

Please include a 300-word appraisal of the strengths and weaknesses of the design of the New Statesman magazine and website.

The deadline for applications is 1 August and the contract begins on 15 September

Photo: Getty
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Sooner or later, a British university is going to go bankrupt

Theresa May's anti-immigration policies will have a big impact - and no-one is talking about it. 

The most effective way to regenerate somewhere? Build a university there. Of all the bits of the public sector, they have the most beneficial local effects – they create, near-instantly, a constellation of jobs, both directly and indirectly.

Don’t forget that the housing crisis in England’s great cities is the jobs crisis everywhere else: universities not only attract students but create graduate employment, both through directly working for the university or servicing its students and staff.

In the United Kingdom, when you look at the renaissance of England’s cities from the 1990s to the present day, universities are often unnoticed and uncelebrated but they are always at the heart of the picture.

And crucial to their funding: the high fees of overseas students. Thanks to the dominance of Oxford and Cambridge in television and film, the wide spread of English around the world, and the soft power of the BBC, particularly the World Service,  an education at a British university is highly prized around of the world. Add to that the fact that higher education is something that Britain does well and the conditions for financially secure development of regional centres of growth and jobs – supposedly the tentpole of Theresa May’s agenda – are all in place.

But at the Home Office, May did more to stop the flow of foreign students into higher education in Britain than any other minister since the Second World War. Under May, that department did its utmost to reduce the number of overseas students, despite opposition both from BIS, then responsible for higher education, and the Treasury, then supremely powerful under the leadership of George Osborne.

That’s the hidden story in today’s Office of National Statistics figures showing a drop in the number of international students. Even small falls in the number of international students has big repercussions for student funding. Take the University of Hull – one in six students are international students. But remove their contribution in fees and the University’s finances would instantly go from surplus into deficit. At Imperial, international students make up a third of the student population – but contribute 56 per cent of student fee income.

Bluntly – if May continues to reduce student numbers, the end result is going to be a university going bust, with massive knock-on effects, not only for research enterprise but for the local economies of the surrounding area.

And that’s the trajectory under David Cameron, when the Home Office’s instincts faced strong countervailing pressure from a powerful Treasury and a department for Business, Innovation and Skills that for most of his premiership hosted a vocal Liberal Democrat who needed to be mollified. There’s every reason to believe that the Cameron-era trajectory will accelerate, rather than decline, now that May is at the Treasury, the new department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy doesn’t even have responsibility for higher education anymore. (That’s back at the Department for Education, where the Secretary of State, Justine Greening, is a May loyalist.)

We talk about the pressures in the NHS or in care, and those, too, are warning lights in the British state. But watch out too, for a university that needs to be bailed out before long. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.