The new trailer for Grand Theft Auto V looks great, but how will I find the time to play it?

The new Rockstar game comes out in the second quarter of next year.

The latest Grand Theft Auto trailer came out today, and it makes the game look a) even more attractive than the New York of GTAIV; b) just as violent and full of angry women telling you not to do things you want to do.

Anyway, enjoy: I'm hoping that by the time the game is released next year, I've cleared the enormous backlog of games I've half-played, want to replay, or want to play co-op or using online multiplayer. I'm currently juggling Dishonored, Halo 4, Borderlands 2 and XCOM, and I can see Assassins Creed 3 and Far Cry 3 shimmering on the horizon. (No Black Ops II, mind, because the first one was insultingly short.)

Grand Theft Auto V: the new trailer.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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“The Hole-Up”: a poem by Matthew Sweeney

“You could taste the raw / seagull you’d killed and plucked, / the mussels you’d dug from sand, / the jellyfish that wobbled in your / hands as you slobbered it.”

Lying on your mouth and nose
on the hot sand, you recall
a trip in a boat to the island –
the fat rats that skittered about
after god-knows-what dinner,
the chubby seals staring up,
the sudden realisation that a man
on the run had wintered there
while the soldiers scoured
the entire shoreline to no avail –
you knew now you had been him
out there. You could taste the raw
seagull you’d killed and plucked,
the mussels you’d dug from sand,
the jellyfish that wobbled in your
hands as you slobbered it.
You saw again that first flame
those rubbed stones woke in
the driftwood pile, and that rat
you grilled on a spar and found
delicious. Yes, you’d been that man,
and you had to admit now you
missed that time, that life,
though you were very glad you
had no memory of how it ended.


Matthew Sweeney’s Black Moon was shortlisted for the 2007 T S Eliot Prize. His latest collection is Inquisition Lane (Bloodaxe).

This article first appeared in the 21 July 2016 issue of the New Statesman, The English Revolt