Japan's first robot astronaut is both useful and adorable

At just 13 inches tall, cheery-faced Kirobo is designed to help astronauts cope with loneliness during missions.

It's not quite as good as being able to take a pet dog or cat into orbit, but Kirobo - 13 inches tall, weighing 2kg - is a pretty good alternative. He went up to the ISS on a Japanese resupply mission in August, but is only beginning his research mission today.

He - well, "it" if we're being accurate - isn't meant to help astronauts with technical tasks, or carry out his own spacewalks. He's an emotional resource. Space can be lonely, and having someone to talk to can be comforting.

Voice and face recognition combined with natural language processing give him the ability to converse with humans. His name is a merger of "kibo" - "hope in Japanese, and the name of the nation's research module on the ISS - and robot.

While he flew up to the ISS in August, he's only being joined today by Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata, who originally trained Kirobo to speak. Wakata is part of a three-man crew launching from Kazakhstan, and when he arrives he'll enjoy the distinction of two new records - the first astronaut to chat with a robot in space, and the ISS's first Japanese commander.

But of course you actually want to see Kirobo in action, so here he is:

Kirobo's mission will end in December 2014, when he'll return to Earth. When humans travel to Mars, data on how to cope in isolation for long periods is going to be essential for keeping astronauts emotionally stable - and, unlike 2001: A Space Odyssey's HAL, Kirobo may prove a friendlier model of companion.

Kirobo, bringing joy to the lonely on the ISS. (Photo: Kibo Robot Project)

Ian Steadman is a staff science and technology writer at the New Statesman. He is on Twitter as @iansteadman.

jiedaibao
Show Hide image

Chinese loan sharks are using nudes as collateral. Is this the grim future of revenge porn?

The economics of shame. 

When female students in Guangdong, a southern province in China, applied for a small loan, they were met with a very specific demand. Send naked photos of yourself holding your ID cards, they were told – or you won’t get the money. If you don’t pay up, we’ll make the photos public.

This is according to Nandu Daily, the area’s local newspaper, but has also been reported by the Associated Press and the Financial Times. The FT places the trend in the context of the Chinese economy, where peer to peer lending sites like Jiedaibao, the platform where the students allegedly contacted the lenders, are common. Thanks to the country’s slowing economy, the paper argues, lenders are increasingly intent on making sure they’ll be repaid.

As a result, there have also been reports of property destruction and even beatings by loan sharks. Part of the problem is that these are unregulated lenders who operate through an online platform. In this case, Jiedaibao says the agreement about photos was made via different communication channels, and told the FT: “This is an illegal offline trade between victims and lenders who did it by making use of the platform.” 

This new use of naked photos in this case, though, plays to the ways that shame is now used as a weapon, especially online – and the fact that it can essentially be monetised.

Revenge porn is a huge and growing problem. As Jon Ronson noted in his book, So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed, the internet offers a unique space in which shamings (over a naked photo, or an unwise comment) can be transmitted all over the world almost instantly. For some, this threat is simply too much to cope with, as it was for the growing number teenagers who have committed suicide after being blackmailed with naked photos

It’s telling, too, that the students targeted with these demands were, reportedly at least, women. Most victims of revenge porn are also women. The shame brought down on women who appear in these photos is not so much about their nakedness, but the implication that they've behaved in a sexual way. In China, virginity is still highly valued in marriage, and your family and friends would likely take the spread of naked photos of you extremely seriously. In Behind the Red Door, Sex in China , Richard Burger notes:

Every year, thousands of Chinese women pay for an operation to restore their hymens shortly before their wedding so that husbands can see blood on the sheets on their honeymoon night.

The strange story of these students and their loans highlights two important points. First, as anti-loan shark campaigners have argued for decades, “free choice” in signing up to extortionate fees or demands when taking out a loan is a misnomer when you’re constrained by economic need and desperation.

But second, we can’t allow the shame around female sexuality to become a commodity. We need to both protect women's rights and persecute those who share images without consent, but also fight the stigma that makes these shamings possible in the first place. It's not acceptable that the suggestion of sexual activity can still be used to ruin women's lives.

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.