Unemployment flat at 7.8 per cent

Employment rises by 0.1 percentage point to 71.5 per cent.

The unemployment rate has stayed flat at 7.8 per cent for the months of April to June 2013, according to the ONS. There are 4,000 fewer unemployed people than there were in the months of January to March this year.

The employment rate for those aged from 16 to 64 has risen by 0.1 percentage point over the same period, to 71.5 per cent.

The unemployment rate has taken on a new significance in the last month, since the Bank of England governor Mark Carney announced that the Bank would be targeting a rate of 7 per cent as part of its new forward guidance plans.

But, despite a widespread narrative that unemployment is consistently falling, this is now the seventh straight report in which unemployment has been higher than its recent low. The level seems to have stagnated around 7.8 per cent, leaving Carney in no fear of having to live up to his promise any time soon.

There is better news, of sorts, in the figures for earnings. Total pay rose by 2.1 per cent in the twelve months to June, up 0.3 percentage points compared to the last report. It remains 0.8 per cent below inflation, making this the 41st straight report in which real wages have declined year-on-year:

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.