File this one away in the "we'll see" pile

An exodus after the election?

The chief executive of deVere Group, "the world’s largest independent financial advisory firm", wants you to know that this time, rich people really mean it when they say they'll leave the country this time if taxes go up. Nick Green says:

The astute number crunchers at the Institute for Fiscal Studies have shown that the government will have little alternative but to borrow more or increase taxes to pay for the Chancellor’s budget. As this is after an election, a time when MPs can more afford to take controversial measures, it is highly probable that the new government would opt for the former [sic, but I think he means latter] – taxes would be hiked up…

As so-called ‘high tax Britain’ is set to become ‘even higher tax Britain’, I would fully expect there to be something of a wealth exodus from the UK as wealthy Brits and non-domiciled taxpayers in the UK seek to move themselves and assets to lower-tax jurisdictions in order to safeguard their funds.

We've already had that argument, of course. After the 50p tax was introduced, there was a drop in the number of bankers fleeing to Switzerland, with the majority of avoidance taking the form of bringing forward payments (which is part of the reason why cutting the rate so soon was a stupid idea – that's not a trick you can perform twice). And we'll see what happens from 1 April, but I'll be we don't get an exodus of bankers from Switzerland to Britain once the 50p tax dies either.

File this one away for the future, in other words – it could make tasty claim chowder.


Boarding the private jet… Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.