Japan targets the stock market

The Nikkei at 13,000 is the new target.

Japan's stock market is on a tear today, apparently due to yet another unconventional economic move from its populist right-wing government. After attacking its central bank's independence, "nationalising" industrial stock and announcing a £70bn stimulus package for the stagnant economy, the country's economic ministry made another shock move over the weekend.

Akira Amrai, Japan's economic minister, said in a speech that:

It will be important to show our mettle and see the Nikkei reach the 13,000 mark by the end of the fiscal year (March 31)… We want to continue taking (new) steps to help stock prices rise.

Before and after… the Nikkei jumped 200 points after Amrai's comments.

The Nikkei at 13,000 would require 17 per cent growth in the next two months, which is ambitious. But now that we've had a change to see how the market reacts to such the move, it's looking very possible indeed.

The government announcing it has a stock market target is largely a self-fulfilling prophecy: stock markets tend to price in future gains, and a government announcing that a certain level is now a matter of policy is as near certain as gains can get. Even if it undershoots, it's still clear that the statement has helped Japanese companies. The biggest direct concern is that such a statement might lead to a dangerous asset bubble, but a Nikkei of 13,000 would, if anything, remain underpriced. So long as the government doesn't get carried away with its success, the move seems to be a smart one.

Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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To stop Jeremy Corbyn, I am giving my second preference to Andy Burnham

The big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Voting is now underway in the Labour leadership election. There can be no doubt that Jeremy Corbyn is the frontrunner, but the race isn't over yet.

I know from conversations across the country that many voters still haven't made up their mind.

Some are drawn to Jeremy's promises of a new Jerusalem and endless spending, but worried that these endless promises, with no credibility, will only serve to lose us the next general election.

Others are certain that a Jeremy victory is really a win for Cameron and Osborne, but don't know who is the best alternative to vote for.

I am supporting Liz Kendall and will give her my first preference. But polling data is brutally clear: the big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Andy can win. He can draw together support from across the party, motivated by his history of loyalty to the Labour movement, his passionate appeal for unity in fighting the Tories, and the findings of every poll of the general public in this campaign that he is best placed candidate to win the next general election.

Yvette, in contrast, would lose to Jeremy Corbyn and lose heavily. Evidence from data collected by all the campaigns – except (apparently) Yvette's own – shows this. All publicly available polling shows the same. If Andy drops out of the race, a large part of the broad coalition he attracts will vote for Jeremy. If Yvette is knocked out, her support firmly swings behind Andy.

We will all have our views about the different candidates, but the real choice for our country is between a Labour government and the ongoing rightwing agenda of the Tories.

I am in politics to make a real difference to the lives of my constituents. We are all in the Labour movement to get behind the beliefs that unite all in our party.

In the crucial choice we are making right now, I have no doubt that a vote for Jeremy would be the wrong choice – throwing away the next election, and with it hope for the next decade.

A vote for Yvette gets the same result – her defeat by Jeremy, and Jeremy's defeat to Cameron and Osborne.

In the crucial choice between Yvette and Andy, Andy will get my second preference so we can have the best hope of keeping the fight for our party alive, and the best hope for the future of our country too.

Tom Blenkinsop is the Labour MP for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland