Osborne lashes himself to the mast ahead of Q4 GDP figures

Prepared for the worst.

George Osborne, addressing attendees of the World Economic Forum in Davos, promised to ignore the recommendations of the IMF and carry on with austerity even if the GDP figures for the fourth quarter of 2012 — due to be released today — are negative.

The Financial Times reports that:

He repeated past comments that the economy was “walking a difficult road, but heading in the right direction”.

That "difficult road" is an increasingly lonely one. The IMF's chief economist, Oliver Blanchard, warned yesterday that a slow start to 2013 would be a good hint that the chancellor ought to "tone down" attempts to reduce the deficit with haste.

Meanwhile, it is widely expected that the UK will lose its AAA credit rating with at least one of the major ratings agencies. The agencies, while mainly reactionary in how they decide ratings, were frequently cited by Osborne as arbiters of financial responsibility in the first years of his chancellorship. Losing their backing would be a blow.

The range of forecasts for the figures out today spreads from -0.5 to +0.2 per cent. We shall find out the truth in two hours.

Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

A second referendum? Photo: Getty
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Will there be a second EU referendum? Petition passes 1.75 million signatures

Updated: An official petition for a second EU referendum has passed 1.75m signatures - but does it have any chance of happening?

A petition calling for another EU referendum has passed 1.75 million signatures

"We the undersigned call upon HM Government to implement a rule that if the remain or leave vote is less than 60% based a turnout less than 75% there should be another referendum," the petition reads. Overall, the turnout in the EU referendum on 23 June was 73 per cent, and 51.8 per cent of voters went for Leave.

The petition has been so popular it briefly crashed the government website, and is now the biggest petition in the site's history.

After 10,000 signatures, the government has to respond to an official petition. After 100,000 signatures, it must be considered for a debate in parliament. 

Nigel Farage has previously said he would have asked for a second referendum based on a 52-48 result in favour of Remain.

However, what the petition is asking for would be, in effect, for Britain to stay as a member of the EU. Turnout of 75 per cent is far higher than recent general elections, and a margin of victory of 20 points is also ambitious. In the 2014 independence referendum in Scotland, the split was 55-45 in favour of remaining in the union. 

Unfortunately for those dismayed by the referendum result, even if the petition is debated in parliament, there will be no vote and it will have no legal weight. 

Another petition has been set up for London to declare independence, which has attracted 130,000 signatures.