Economic lookahead: w/c 12 March

Unemployment figures released, second Greek bailout discussed, and goldbugs debating at the IEA.

Monday

  • Eurozone finance ministers meet, and are expected to approve the second Greek bailout now that the country has fulfilled it requirements by convincing creditors to drop more than €100bn of debt'
  • UN World Water Development Report says demand for water is threatening all major development targets.
  • World Travel & Tourism Council say that air passenger duty is costing the UK economy billions.
  • Centre for Economics & Business Research blame rising commodity prices for a fall in real disposeable income in the UK.
  • FSB's Voice of Small Business Index released.

 

Tuesday

  • Annual review of the inflation basket. Previous years have seen the introduction of Blu-ray players and flatscreen TV's, and the merging of "women's trousers" and "women's skirts".
  • OECD harmonised unemployment rates; released the day before the UK's own unemployment figures, these serve as a useful international comparator.
  • Department for Communities and Local Government release their house price index. The only government-collated house price index, these will be the figures to use to examine the NewBuy program.
  • ONS releases the UK trade figures.

 

Wednesday

  • UK unemployment figures released. Expected to show a rise in unemployment and youth unemployment.
  • Mark Hoban, Financial Secretary, will be up in front of the European Scrutiny Committee talking about the eurozone debt crisis.
  • Consumer Credit Counselling Service will release their annual statistical yearbook. Personal debt has fallen out of the spotlight, but there's growing consensus that if there is another debt crisis, this is the sector it will fall upon.
  • Lord Turner, chairman of the FSA, will interviewed by the Treasury Select Committee about mortgages.

 

Thursday

  • OECD launch their report on the medium term environmental outlook.
  • IEA host a discussion on the return to the gold standard, 6:30pm, London.
  • Debate on lowering the price of motherhood at the Resolution Foundation, 10:30am, London.
  • IMF board to discuss the second Greek bailout.

 

Friday

  • Financial policy committee of the Bank of England to meet.
  • Japan releases its monthly economic report.

 

The basket of goods which determines inflation is set to change. Credit: Getty

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
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Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

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