Investment Art: A Beginner's Guide

Forget your shares portfolio - the recession-dodging art market is increasingly proving to be the most profitable place for high-stakes investment

Oscar Wilde may have been mistaken when he claimed “all art is quite useless”. A new use for art has been emerging in recent years, and it may be the most pragmatic of all – as a solid investment. In a time when stock markets are sinking, debts are rising and the looming threat of double-dip recession cannot be entirely eliminated, the art market still sporadically dazzles with record-breaking profits. The unique economic buoyancy of art has long caught the eye of not just aesthetes, but also discerning investors.

Art now falls under the category of the "SWAG" asset. The term, coined by analyst Joe Roseman of Investment Week denotes "alternate investments" which manage to defy economic gravity – namely silver, wine, art and gold.

As well as being decidedly sexier than the FTSE 100, the trend of investing in luxury assets makes a lot of economic common sense. SWAGs often outperform other equities in times of economic downturn for several logical reasons. Firstly, they benefit from the uniquely profitable principle of "scarcity economics" (their value is related to their rarity). Secondly, in an unsteady market, people are drawn to stability, and all the SWAG assets are durable – they have a historical precedence of desirability and can be bought and stored almost indefinitely. Lastly, as their returns are not related to the patterns of the stock market, they add a sensible diversity to any portfolio, the literal asset equivalent of not keeping all your eggs in one basket.

So, we’ve all been there - you’ve got a few spare million in the savings account and you can’t decide whether to invest in the Damien Hirst or the Château Lafite. Luckily, help is at hand. The art market’s unique ability to maintain a bubble of prosperity amidst a global recession has given rise to a new type of business – the art investment advisor.

Businesses of this sort were virtually unheard of a decade ago, and yet the demand  for art purely as an investment has seen a proliferation in recent years. As well as increasing numbers of private banks offering advisory services to their clients, specialist companies such as Fine Art Wealth Management and The Art Investor exist to assist buyers on making choices for bespoke portfolios which can maximise returns. Perhaps most significant in this field, however, is The Fine Art Fund. Set up just over a decade ago by Philip Hoffman, this was the first business of its type to invest in art as an asset. Currently, they manage more than $150m of assets and achieved a net annual return of 6.34 per cent over the past eight years.

Hoffman recently told the Sunday Times, “In the old days people invested in bonds, stocks and cash, and now they’re investing in ten different subject headings and art is just one of them ... People don’t look at their gold bars and, in some cases, they treat art in the same way.”

The rise of these businesses is necessary because the unregulated nature of the art market means that it still straddles an awkward line between solid economic sense and a frantic, wild gamble. On one hand, there are plenty of promising statistics: in 2011, the Financial Times reported that the art market made an 11 per cent return to its investors, a frantic outstripping of stock market return. This year, sales have been promising, with impressive prices achieved at Art Basel in June, and there is a wealth of evidence that the top end of the market has been immune to the turbulence underneath it. In fact, over half of the 20 most expensive auction sales of all time have been completed since 2008, indicating an economic buoyancy which overcomes even the recession.

So far, so lucrative. Yet, the mechanics of the art economy are governed by strange, volatile forces which means that it is never a safe bet. Charles Saatchi himself noted “Art is no investment unless you get very, very lucky” in his 2009 book My Name is Charles Saatchi and I am an Artaholic. In many ways the art market is an economist’s worst nightmare. It is wholly speculative and subjective, and therefore constitutionally unpredictable. The valuation of contemporary art, in particular, is based on a collection of changeable and changing opinions. It is constantly affected by external circumstances, and trends are capable of crashing out of fashion just as swiftly as they crashed it. Additionally, it is fundamentally impossible to confirm the value of the market as a whole. Private sales comprise approximately 75 per cent of the total market, and these are almost always undisclosed. “The art market is the most illiquid, opaque market in the world,” explained Jeff Rabin, quoted in The Art Newspaper. Given this, manoeuvring within it is always going to be a guessing game.

Other industries have, too, sprung up in reaction to the demand of fine-art investment, notably the specialist storage port. Investment art is, emphatically, not bought to be hung on the wall. Instead, collectors are increasingly storing their assets in state-of-the-art warehouses. Christies are currently expanding their "Fine Art Storage Service" due to increased demand, and new ports are due to open in Singapore and Luxenbourg, adding to existing onces in Geneva. These large-scale warehouses offer highly regulated storage controls with humidity and light protection as well as extensive on-site security. They also have a notably appeal to the money-minded collector in that they allow the temporary postponement of VAT and customs duty payments.

The implications of this are vast. Not only with regards to the valuation of art, but with an entire overhaul of its purpose. Art bought as an asset and stored, indefinitely in a warehouse, far from the damaging light of day denotes a new mode of art ownership – one where the object d’art is reduced to a purely monetary transaction.

“It’s a depressing thought,” comments Connie Viney, a London-based artist who regularly exhibits at The Vyner Street Gallery, “Just recently there was the news that Sotheby’s have once again broken their auction record by selling a Rothko for £47.3m. By all accounts, it seems that that price will just increase once again next time it’s sold. With sums like that, how can people think of art becoming anything but a get-rich-quick scheme?”

Is this the real status of art in today's world? Elite, out-priced, stored out of site and endlessly circulated in a micro-economy closed off to all but the super-wealthy? "Art for art’s sake" is a 19th century concept. "Art for the people", too, is becoming swiftly outdated. The motto for our times, it seems, is "Art for the 1 per cent".

Auctioneers place bids during the Damien Hirst's Beautiful Inside My Head Forever, at Sotheby's in 2008. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

Kamila Kocialkowska is a freelance journalist based in London.

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Paul Auster's 4 3 2 1 is by turns rewarding and maddening – just like life

Auster’s epic new novel of immigration, politics and consciousness is rich but imperfect.

It’s a cliché, or a joke: the immigrant who arrives in the New World from the Old Country, to be greeted by an official who promptly renames him, mishearing the strange tongue that the arrival speaks. Paul Auster’s new novel begins: “According to family legend, Ferguson’s grandfather departed on foot from his native city of Minsk with one hundred rubles sewn into the lining of his jacket, travelled west to Hamburg through Warsaw and Berlin, and then booked passage on a ship called the Empress of China, which crossed the Atlantic in rough winter storms and sailed into New York Harbor on the first day of the twentieth century.”

Ferguson’s grandfather is called Isaac Reznikoff. Another Russian Jew advises him that it will be wiser to give his name as “Rockefeller” to the official. “You can’t go wrong with that.” But when it is his turn, “the weary immigrant blurted out in Yiddish, Ikh hob fargessen (I’ve forgotten)! And so it was that Isaac Reznikoff began his new life in America as Ichabod Ferguson.”

A joke or a fable: the way that so many stories begin in America, the stories of those who sailed past the Statue of Liberty and the words inscribed on its base, words to welcome the tired, the poor, those masses yearning to breathe free. And so Auster, in his first novel in seven years, presents the reader with an Everyman, Ferguson-who-is-not-Ferguson, not the man who stepped off the Empress of China but his grandson, Archibald Isaac Ferguson, the cranky protagonist and hero of this tale.

Ichabod begat Stanley and Stanley begat Archie, who was born, like his creator, in Newark, New Jersey, in 1947. This nearly 900-page epic is a Bildungsroman, though it would be more accurate to call it a Bildungs-Bildungs-Bildungs-Bildungsroman, because Archie’s story is told not once but four times. There are that many versions of the protagonist: in each version, his life takes a different turn, and so everything that follows is altered.

Auster is something of a prophet in exile in his own land. His brand of existentialist postmodernism – in which characters with the author’s name might appear, in which texts loop back on themselves to question the act of writing, in which the music of chance can be heard loud and clear – has sometimes found greater favour in Europe than it has in his native United States. For example, City of Glass, the 1985 meta-detective novel that forms part of The New York Trilogy, will be adapted for the stage here this year.

But City of Glass, like all of Auster’s previous books, is a slender novel. The New York Trilogy as a whole comes in at just over 300 pages. Where much of Auster’s work is elliptical, 4 3 2 1 can be overwhelming, but that is precisely the point. The author creates a vast portrait of the turbulent mid-20th century by giving his protagonist this series of lives. The book is divided into sections that clearly mark which Ferguson we are getting: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 or 1.4.

Yet there is nothing supernatural about this journey lived and relived, as there was in Kate Atkinson’s Life After Life. The only magic involved is the magic of the novelist’s imagination, which allows both writer and reader to juggle realities as if they were balls in the air.

However, it is not as if one Ferguson is midshipman and another a circus performer, or one a loudmouth and another shy and retiring. The strength of this novel is that Ferguson remains himself while events shift around him, changing the course of his life. Ferguson’s father dies, or Ferguson’s father lives but divorces his mother, Rose. What happens then? Rose is a talented photographer; does she continue her work when Stanley prospers and they move to the suburbs, or does she take up golf and bridge? Ferguson is a good student, always a writer: does he go to Princeton or Columbia? What’s the difference between translating poetry in a Paris attic and working as a journalist for the Rochester Times-Union?

At its best, 4 3 2 1 is a full immersion in Ferguson’s consciousness, which, perhaps, is a consciousness not too far removed from Auster’s. His protagonist’s youth is wonderfully, vividly conveyed. Even if you don’t care about baseball, you’ll come to care about it because Ferguson does. The details of the young Ferguson’s life are carefully and lovingly created: the powder-blue Pontiac that his mother drives, the pot roast and cheese blintzes served at the Claremont Diner in Montclair, New Jersey – and  the floorboards in an old house that creak when two young lovers make their way between their separate rooms in the middle of the night. Auster builds a world of heartfelt, lived-in detail.

But this is a novel of politics, too. Ferguson is a young man during the tumult of the late 1960s, when dozens were killed and hundreds injured during riots in Newark in 1967; when students at Columbia occupied the campus in protest over the war in Vietnam; when young men such as Ferguson could be drafted to fight in that war.

It is in this last third of the novel that the book flags a little, as lists of events tumble on to the page: one paragraph contains the My Lai massacre, the killing of the Black Panther Fred Hampton and the Rolling Stones concert at Altamont. At times, history lessons threaten to overwhelm the narrative, and Ferguson’s story/stories lose the texture and particularity that have made them so compelling. And its ending is abrupt, a tying-up of loose ends that fragments on the final page.

But then lives – real lives – have strange, abrupt endings, too. This is a rich, imperfect book, often rewarding, occasionally maddening. Again, like life, or at least if we’re lucky.

4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster is published by Faber & Faber (880pp, £20)

Erica Wagner is a New Statesman contributing writer and a judge of the 2014 Man Booker Prize. A former literary editor of the Times, her books include Ariel's Gift: Ted Hughes, Sylvia Plath and the Story of “Birthday Letters” and Seizure.

This article first appeared in the 19 January 2017 issue of the New Statesman, The Trump era