The recovery is coming: can we relax yet?

Blue skies are coming.

All this month on economia we’ve been taking stock of where we are five years on from the momentous events that followed the collapse of Lehman Brothers. So much significance has been placed on the events of September 2008, that some commentators are happy now to refer to events purely in terms of them being “post-Lehman”, as if the failure of one institution marked some kind of year zero when the financial world changed forever

While the meltdown in global credit markets certainly followed the collapse of Lehman Brothers, there is plenty of dissention as to whether it was the  trigger for recession it has been portrayed as. Andrew Smithers in his latest book The Road to Recovery (reviewed in the October issue of economia) draws on a wide range of sources to argue strongly against what he calls “the myth of Lehmans”. His argument is that the global economy was in plenty of trouble (and recession had already kicked in) by September 2008. Others still don’t dispute that the collapse of Lehmans was significant but point out that it was significant insofar as the reaction to it from governments around the word led directly to a worsening of the depth of recession.

The argument here is that the painful experience since 2008 was caused by authorities and governments not allowing enough banks to collapse. While the shock would have been much worse in the short term, the recovery would have been sharper and would have taken hold sooner. The banking sector would have emerged with stronger and healthier banks (even if there were fewer of them), and would have been in a better place to help business recover.

National governments might also have been better placed to rebuild economies had they not been propping up failed banks.

But to some extent this is the old story. Five years on from these calamitous events, we are beginning to see the early signs of recovery. There have been various indicators and research reports produced to show that a lasting recovery is taking hold. The biggest question marks now remain over the fragile state of the eurozone and the likely fallout of any further problems in one or more of the troubled member economies, and the trickier issue of whether this recovery (however welcome) is the right sort of recovery.

The chancellor, George Osborne, set his stall out on delivering an export-led recovery that would help rebalance the economy and bring a longer-lasting, sustainable recovery. That the current return to health appears to be built on a new housing bubble and domestic debt remains a concern. It’s the economic equivalent of treating heroin addicts with methadone. It is far better for them (and far better for society) than heroin, and is more controlled, but it can hardly count as a full recovery from dependency. There is a place for this treatment, but let’s not pretend (as a triumphalist chancellor is likely to try and do at his party conference next week) that he has the economy back to anything like a sustainable position.

However, when that real recovery does arrive it will be fuelled by the sort of high-growth businesses that are the drivers of any economy. And on this front there are some interesting insights from a new piece of research from private equity firm ECI Partners. The top line from the report, which is based on a detailed questioning of almost 700 leaders in high-growth firms, is that they are far more confident this year than they have been for the past few years. The vast majority claim to be planning to fund expansion and growth of over 10% in the coming year and most are very confident that they will be easily able to access finance should they need to (this has been a consistent challenge to growth in recent surveys).

While there is a more upbeat tone to the responses from those based in London, and those working in the technology sector, the vast bulk of respondents regardless of sector or location feel that things are moving in the right direction.

Even if the storm clouds had been building since 2007, the storm of recession broke in 2008. Five years on we are beginning to see the first signs of blue skies above. While it is incumbent on everyone to take a hard look at the events of five years ago and make sure we learn the appropriate lessons in areas from audit to corporate governance, from our banking culture to financial regulation, for the time being it is also important to enjoy some good news for once.

This story first appeared on economia.

 

Photograph: Getty Images

Richard Cree is the Editor of Economia.

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Donald Trump vs Barack Obama: How the inauguration speeches compared

We compared the two presidents on trade, foreign affairs and climate change – so you (really, really) don't have to.

After watching Donald Trump's inaugural address, what better way to get rid of the last few dregs of hope than by comparing what he said with Barack Obama's address from 2009? 

Both thanked the previous President, with Trump calling the Obamas "magnificent", and pledged to reform Washington, but the comparison ended there. 

Here is what each of them said: 

On American jobs

Obama:

The state of our economy calls for action, bold and swift.  And we will act, not only to create new jobs, but to lay a new foundation for growth.  We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together.  We'll restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its cost.  We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories.  And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age.

Trump:

For many decades we've enriched foreign industry at the expense of American industry, subsidized the armies of other countries while allowing for the very sad depletion of our military.

One by one, the factories shuttered and left our shores with not even a thought about the millions and millions of American workers that were left behind.

Obama had a plan for growth. Trump just blames the rest of the world...

On global warming

Obama:

With old friends and former foes, we'll work tirelessly to lessen the nuclear threat, and roll back the specter of a warming planet.

Trump:

On the Middle East:

Obama:

To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect. To those leaders around the globe who seek to sow conflict, or blame their society's ills on the West, know that your people will judge you on what you can build, not what you destroy. 

Trump:

We will re-enforce old alliances and form new ones and unite the civilized world against radical Islamic terrorism, which we will eradicate completely from the face of the earth.

On “greatness”

Obama:

In reaffirming the greatness of our nation we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned.

Trump:

America will start winning again, winning like never before.

 

On trade

Obama:

This is the journey we continue today.  We remain the most prosperous, powerful nation on Earth.  Our workers are no less productive than when this crisis began.  Our minds are no less inventive, our goods and services no less needed than they were last week, or last month, or last year.  Our capacity remains undiminished.  

Trump:

We must protect our borders from the ravages of other countries making our product, stealing our companies and destroying our jobs.

Protection will lead to great prosperity and strength. I will fight for you with every breath in my body, and I will never ever let you down.

Stephanie Boland is digital assistant at the New Statesman. She tweets at @stephanieboland