"Painful consequences for the banks in Switzerland"

Business quote of the day.

The blunt reaction of the Swiss Bankers Association to the news its government had announced a landmark deal with the US to end a long-running dispute over banks that help US tax evaders.
 
The news comes following increased pressure on Switzerland due to series of corporate scandals. Swiss bank UBS was fined a record £160m   over its handling of the Libor interbank lending rate. And the country's oldest private bank, shut its doors after pleading guilty  in January to helping wealthy Americans avoid tax.
 
The programme requires Swiss banks to agree to pay substantial penalties, ensure complete disclosure of their cross-border activities and provide detailed information on in which US taxpayers have a direct or indirect interest.

Read the full story here.
 

Photograph: Getty Images
New Statesman
Show Hide image

Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.