The EU's cat-herder-in-chief fails to move the markets where he wants

Mario Draghi strained to have an effect, but to no avail.

Unfortunately all rather boring really – and not a little bizarre. Whilst S. Draghi seemed to be straining every sinew to give the impression that the market simply was not understanding the full significance of his message to the members of the Governing Council to "expect key interest rates to remain at present or lower levels for an extended period of time", he just couldn't quite get the market to play ball.

He could hardly have dropped more hints that we should be expecting rates to stay were they are, or move lower, for many, many quarters. He stressed (twice) that the ECB's Deposit Rate, could go lower, even though it is currently zero. He stressed that liquidity would remain ample, and if it didn't, he'd see to it (presumably with another Long Term Refinancing Operation, LTRO)

He even borrowed the Bank of England's assertion that "the current market pricing of rate hikes is unwarranted". Getting a little desperate, maybe, he emphasized the pathetic growth in money supply, and that lending by banks in the periphery was still very weak.

Despite all his efforts, futures markets remained steadfastly rooted to the spot by the time he finished, stubbornly refusing to extend their timescale for rate hikes, however he may insist they should. The euro weakened a little initially, but then recouped some of its losses – which may have been caused by a strong dollar anyway.

Perhaps the problem is that markets know he has the most unenviable role in major central bank leadership – he needs to be an Olympic-level Cat herder. Everything is compromise, mixed with liberal amounts of bowing and scraping to the Bundesbank. Therefore the markets are screaming "show us the money!" – until he actually cuts rates, or adds another LTRO, or firms up his forward guidance with depressingly distant economic thresholds, investors remain very sceptical of the current, "words are easy" form of forward guidance.

Finally, what about publication of ECB meeting minutes? They couldn't even reach a decision on this-Mr Draghi announced an intention to publish more specific information on decisions taken by the GC, but, the discussion is at an "early stage". The ECB board is to make proposal in the Autumn. Yawn.

Look for some, (but surely not all!), of these actions next month or in October.

Mario Draghi, the chief cat-herder of the EU. Photograph: Getty Images

Chairman of  Saxo Capital Markets Board

An Honours Graduate from Oxford University, Nick Beecroft has over 30 years of international trading experience within the financial industry, including senior Global Markets roles at Standard Chartered Bank, Deutsche Bank and Citibank. Nick was a member of the Bank of England's Foreign Exchange Joint Standing Committee.

More of his work can be found here.

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Paul Nuttall is like his party: sad, desperate and finished

The party hope if they can survive until March 2019, they will grow strong off disillusionment with Brexit. They may not make it until then. 

It’s a measure of how far Ukip have fallen that while Theresa May faced a grilling over her social care U-Turn and Jeremy Corbyn was called to account over his past, the opening sections of Andrew Neill’s interview with Paul Nuttall was about the question of whether or not his party has a future.

The blunt truth is that Ukip faces a battering in this election. They will be blown away in the seats they have put up a candidate in and have pre-emptively retreated from numerous contests across the country.

A party whose leader in Wales once said that climate change was “ridiculous” is now the victim of climate change itself. With Britain heading out of the European Union and Theresa May in Downing Street, it’s difficult to work out what the pressing question in public life to which Ukip is the answer.

Their quest for relevance isn’t helped by Paul Nuttall, who at times tonight cast an unwittingly comic figure. Pressing his case for Ukip’s burka ban, he said earnestly: “For [CCTV] to work, you have to see people’s faces.” It was if he had intended to pick up Nigel Farage’s old dogwhistle and instead put a kazoo to his lips.

Remarks that are, written down, offensive, just carried a stench of desperation. Nuttall’s policy prescriptions – a noun, a verb, and the most rancid comment underneath a Mail article – came across as a cry for attention. Small wonder that senior figures in Ukip expect Nuttall to face a move on his position, though they also expect that he will see off any attempt to remove him from his crown.

But despite his poor performance, Ukip might not be dead yet. There was a gleam of strategy amid the froth from Nuttall in the party’s pledge to oppose any continuing payment to Brussels as part of the Brexit deal, something that May and Corbyn have yet to rule out.

If May does manage to make it back to Downing Street on 8 June, the gap between campaign rhetoric – we’ll have the best Brexit, France will pay for it – and government policy – we’ll pay a one-off bill and continuing contributions if need be – will be fertile territory for Ukip, if they can survive as a going concern politically and financially, until March 2019.

On tonight’s performance, they’ll need a better centre-forward than Paul Nuttall if they are to make it that far. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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