Companies ease out of financial distress

34 per cent decline in "critical" difficulties.

Fewer companies are facing severe financial distress than they were a year ago, in a sign that the economic climate might be improving in the UK

According to the Begbies Traynor Red Flag Alert for Q1, there has a been a 34 per cent decline in companies rated as having “critical” financial difficulties. Across all sectors, the number of companies reduced from 5,000 in the first quarter of last year, to 3283 in Q1 2013.

However, Begbies Traynor warned that the improvement “masks a patchy recovery” and said that sectors reliant on the consumer economy such as retail, leisure, media and real estate had seen an increase in financial distress for the period.

Plus, taken on a quarterly basis, there has been an 8 per cent increase in critical companies from the last quarter of 2012.

The number of leisure companies facing severe financial distress has rocketed by 81 per cent since last quarter, which the report says may be due to unseasonably cold weather in the start of the year. The number of construction companies in critical conditions almost halved compared on last year’s numbers, whereas the real estate sector hs seen fincnail ditress levels rise 24 per cent in the last year.

Julie Palmer, partner at Begbies Traynor, said, “The year on year improvement reflects the continued forbearance and benign monetary conditions facing UK businesses today, combined with an improving credit environment, albeit primarily for larger corporates. Business confidence is slowly returning in the form of greater business spending on both services and investment.”

The report also sounds concern over the lack of funding available to support the SME sector. The number of companies that managed to secure new funding had dropped by 14.5 per cent from a year ago, and down 11 per cent on a quarterly basis.

Palmer added: “The underlying trend is arguably one of an improving picture. However, given the slight increase in distress compared to the previous quarter, it remains to be seen if we are out of the woods yet. With business rate increases planned in April, HMRC’s new PAYE Real Time Information requirements coming into effect, and further minimum wage rises ahead there are still significant headwinds for the UK SME sector, which is typically less able to bear the burden of these changes than their larger counterparts.”

The support services and professional services sectors have seen the strongest recovery in the last year.

This story first appeared on economia

Photograph: Getty Images

This is a news story from economia.

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It's Gary Lineker 1, the Sun 0

The football hero has found himself at the heart of a Twitter storm over the refugee children debate.

The Mole wonders what sort of topsy-turvy universe we now live in where Gary Lineker is suddenly being called a “political activist” by a Conservative MP? Our favourite big-eared football pundit has found himself in a war of words with the Sun newspaper after wading into the controversy over the age of the refugee children granted entry into Britain from Calais.

Pictures published earlier this week in the right-wing press prompted speculation over the migrants' “true age”, and a Tory MP even went as far as suggesting that these children should have their age verified by dental X-rays. All of which leaves your poor Mole with a deeply furrowed brow. But luckily the British Dental Association was on hand to condemn the idea as unethical, inaccurate and inappropriate. Phew. Thank God for dentists.

Back to old Big Ears, sorry, Saint Gary, who on Wednesday tweeted his outrage over the Murdoch-owned newspaper’s scaremongering coverage of the story. He smacked down the ex-English Defence League leader, Tommy Robinson, in a single tweet, calling him a “racist idiot”, and went on to defend his right to express his opinions freely on his feed.

The Sun hit back in traditional form, calling for Lineker to be ousted from his job as host of the BBC’s Match of the Day. The headline they chose? “Out on his ears”, of course, referring to the sporting hero’s most notable assets. In the article, the tabloid lays into Lineker, branding him a “leftie luvvie” and “jug-eared”. The article attacked him for describing those querying the age of the young migrants as “hideously racist” and suggested he had breached BBC guidelines on impartiality.

All of which has prompted calls for a boycott of the Sun and an outpouring of support for Lineker on Twitter. His fellow football hero Stan Collymore waded in, tweeting that he was on “Team Lineker”. Leading the charge against the Murdoch-owned title was the close ally of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and former Channel 4 News economics editor, Paul Mason, who tweeted:

Lineker, who is not accustomed to finding himself at the centre of such highly politicised arguments on social media, responded with typical good humour, saying he had received a bit of a “spanking”.

All of which leaves the Mole with renewed respect for Lineker and an uncharacteristic desire to watch this weekend’s Match of the Day to see if any trace of his new activist persona might surface.


I'm a mole, innit.