Bitcoin: according to Google trends, Russia is the most Bit-curious country

UPDATE: Bitcoin up again, now over $150

The number of people typing "Bitcoin" into Google is rising everywhere as the value of the virtual currency increases - but nowhere are searchers more feverish than in Russia. According to Google trends Russians are performing the most searches for "Bitcoin" -  followed by Estonia, and then the US and Finland.

The Telegraph suggests this lends support to the idea that Bitcoin's recent rise was driven by the situation in Cyprus, as government trust plummeted and savers looked for ways to circumvent the banks. Russian businesses were hit particularly hard by the crisis as they accounted for around €19bn of Cypriot deposits.

But Russia was topping Bitcoin Google trends as far back as July 2011, and there might be older reasons for Russian interest. The currency has obvious advantages in BRIC countries - outlined a few of them in this post 9 months ago:

Bitcoin has a bigger potential to improve the lives for those whose savings are at risk of devaluation through inflation, for those whose payments are made costlier as the result of payment system fees, and most importantly for those whose governments impose restrictions on how their money is used.

And once online wagering services like SatoshiDICE had added translations into Russian, the currency faced no barriers to expansion:

Because Bitcoin is not a corporation, nor a bank, nor an agency of any government, nor any formal organization it can thus continue to expand, permeating the BRICs and beyond, organically just as it exists today.  This is an expected and natural progression for this currency.

The currency value continues to soar - on Friday, a single Bitcoin traded at around $135.

UPDATE: now over $150, according to Business Insider

These bears don't know what Bitcoin is. Photograph: Getty Images
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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.