Japan's next central banker promises "whatever it takes" to fight deflation

Kuroda pulls a Draghi.

Japan is where all the action in monetary policy is taking place, and the news this weekend is no exception. Haruhiko Kuroda, the man who is likely to become the new governor of the Bank of Japan following his nomination by prime minister Shinzo Abe, has apparently been taking lessons from Mario Draghi.

Bloomberg's Michael McDonough tells the story:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The crucial phrase there is "whatever it takes". That's the phrase which has gone down in history as the turning point in the euro crisis. Last July, Mario Draghi promised to do "whatever it takes" to preserve the euro — and from that moment, Italian bond yields fell almost consistently until mid-February when traders realised how shambolic the election was gearing up to be. This chart from Business Insider shows just how strong the effect was:

 

Kuroda will be hoping he can have half the effect of Draghi. But since the effectiveness of promising to do whatever it takes is dependent on everyone believing that you actually will, Japan has an advantage in this game. The lengths the government has gone to to tackle deflation already far exceed anything any other country has attempted, and it would appear they are only getting started.

Haruhiko Kuroda. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Police shoot man in parliament

A man carrying what appeared to be a knife was shot by armed police after entering the parliamentary estate. 

From the window of the parliamentary Press Gallery, I have just seen police shoot a man who charged at officers while carrying what appeared to be a knife. A large crowd was seen fleeing from the man before he entered the parliamentary estate.

After several officers evaded him he was swiftly shot by armed police.

Ministers have been evacuated and journalists ordered to remain at their desks. 

More follows. Read Julia Rampen's news story here.

Armed police at the cordon outside Parliament on Wednesday afternoon. Photo: Getty

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.