Waitrose suffers a PR meltdown

The ADgenda: This week's worst advertising decision

Waitrose suffered a PR meltdown this week. The supermarket chain known for its squeaky clean image took a bit of a dive in the reputation stakes when Greenpeace launched a campaign calling for Waitrose to "Dump Shell". The campaign's main objection is that the oil giant has a track record for irresponsible drilling in the Arctic and that Waitrose, as a brand that prides itself on promoting green values, now seems to be jumping into bed with the enemy, namely by placing own-branded cafes at Shell garages across the country.

Environmental campaigners decided to make their feelings heard through the Waitrose Facebook page, commenting on dessert recipe links with their own take on the matter "Where's the recipe for Baked Alaska?" and "Help, my dessert has gone wrong, the edges of my arctic are melting" were just a choice few. To which Waitrose responded with a resounding "Delete". Don't like what someone's saying about you? Wipe it from the records.

This must have seemed like a quick and easy solution, and a collective sigh of relief probably went up from the Waitrose headquarters as all that bad press was removed with one effortless click. But these things do have a habit of coming back to bite bums, and the response from the commenters was a renewed scattergun approach, doubling their typing efforts to denounce the Waitrose brand. In fact, all the deletions did was to stoke the fire - encouraging ever more Facebook users to weigh in with their tuppence worth.

Did the Lord McAlpine Twitter debacle teach this PR lot nothing? Just as knee-jerk tweeting can come back to haunt you, reactionary deleting is never going to go unnoticed. In an online world where everything is archived you can't just click your way to a spotless brand reputation.

"Where's the recipe for Baked Alaska?" Photograph: Getty Images
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Lord Geoffrey Howe dies, age 88

Howe was Margaret Thatcher's longest serving Cabinet minister – and the man credited with precipitating her downfall.

The former Conservative chancellor Lord Howe, a key figure in the Thatcher government, has died of a suspected heart attack, his family has said. He was 88.

Geoffrey Howe was the longest-serving member of Margaret Thatcher's Cabinet, playing a key role in both her government and her downfall. Born in Port Talbot in 1926, he began his career as a lawyer, and was first elected to parliament in 1964, but lost his seat just 18 months later.

Returning as MP for Reigate in the Conservative election victory of 1970, he served in the government of Edward Heath, first as Solicitor General for England & Wales, then as a Minister of State for Trade. When Margaret Thatcher became opposition leader in 1975, she named Howe as her shadow chancellor.

He retained this brief when the party returned to government in 1979. In the controversial budget of 1981, he outlined a radical monetarist programme, abandoning then-mainstream economic thinking by attempting to rapidly tackle the deficit at a time of recession and unemployment. Following the 1983 election, he was appointed as foreign secretary, in which post he negotiated the return of Hong Kong to China.

In 1989, Thatcher demoted Howe to the position of leader of the house and deputy prime minister. And on 1 November 1990, following disagreements over Britain's relationship with Europe, he resigned from the Cabinet altogether. 

Twelve days later, in a powerful speech explaining his resignation, he attacked the prime minister's attitude to Brussels, and called on his former colleagues to "consider their own response to the tragic conflict of loyalties with which I have myself wrestled for perhaps too long".

Labour Chancellor Denis Healey once described an attack from Howe as "like being savaged by a dead sheep" - but his resignation speech is widely credited for triggering the process that led to Thatcher's downfall. Nine days later, her premiership was over.

Howe retired from the Commons in 1992, and was made a life peer as Baron Howe of Aberavon. He later said that his resignation speech "was not intended as a challenge, it was intended as a way of summarising the importance of Europe". 

Nonetheless, he added: "I am sure that, without [Thatcher's] resignation, we would not have won the 1992 election... If there had been a Labour government from 1992 onwards, New Labour would never have been born."

Jonn Elledge is the editor of the New Statesman's sister site CityMetric. He is on Twitter, far too much, as @JonnElledge.