Formula for box-office gold? Make a Bond film that's not a Bond film

Box-office hit.

It's been called the greatest Bond film of all time, and the figures confirm it: Skyfall has broken the UK seven-day box-office record and posted £180m in its first 10 days across the globe.

Why has it done so well? Perhaps because it's not really a Bond film at all. Skyfall has taken a tongue-in-cheek action franchise with a protagonist who is known for his callous nature and has turned it into a gritty drama with a protagonist who struggles with his feelings. It has taken a character who is famous for never falling in love and made him fall. It has taken a formula with strict limits and has made a point of transgressing them. It has surprising bits, sure. But it's easy to be surprising within a franchise if you're going to utterly depart from the blueprint that defines it.

A cheap trick perhaps - but one which has worked with the box office, and the critics. At the moment we love dramas and flawed, human characters, but we also, nostalgically, love James Bond. And this is surely the formula: take a name everyone recognises and put it to the kind of film that is fashionable now. Disney, with their recent purchase of Star Wars might just be on to a winner.

 

Bond, nearly Bond. Photograph: Getty Images

Martha Gill writes the weekly Irrational Animals column. You can follow her on Twitter here: @Martha_Gill.

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Theresa May knows she's talking nonsense - here's why she's doing it

The Prime Minister's argument increases the sense that this is a time to "lend" - in her words - the Tories your vote.

Good morning.  Angela Merkel and Theresa May are more similar politicians than people think, and that holds true for Brexit too. The German Chancellor gave a speech yesterday, and the message: Brexit means Brexit.

Of course, the emphasis is slightly different. When May says it, it's about reassuring the Brexit elite in SW1 that she isn't going to backslide, and anxious Remainers and soft Brexiteers in the country that it will work out okay in the end.

When Merkel says it, she's setting out what the EU wants and the reality of third country status outside the European Union.  She's also, as with May, tilting to her own party and public opinion in Germany, which thinks that the UK was an awkward partner in the EU and is being even more awkward in the manner of its leaving.

It's a measure of how poor the debate both during the referendum and its aftermath is that Merkel's bland statement of reality - "A third-party state - and that's what Britain will be - can't and won't be able to have the same rights, let alone a better position than a member of the European Union" - feels newsworthy.

In the short term, all this helps Theresa May. Her response - delivered to a carefully-selected audience of Leeds factory workers, the better to avoid awkward questions - that the EU is "ganging up" on Britain is ludicrous if you think about it. A bloc of nations acting in their own interest against their smaller partners - colour me surprised!

But in terms of what May wants out of this election - a massive majority that gives her carte blanche to implement her agenda and puts Labour out of contention for at least a decade - it's a great message. It increases the sense that this is a time to "lend" - in May's words - the Tories your vote. You may be unhappy about the referendum result, you may usually vote Labour - but on this occasion, what's needed is a one-off Tory vote to make Brexit a success.

May's message is silly if you pay any attention to how the EU works or indeed to the internal politics of the EU27. That doesn't mean it won't be effective.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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