Rule by gadgets: demonstrating the Apple Watch. Photo: Jacopo Raule/Getty Images
Anarchic Apple watches? Face it: we like rules
By Steven Poole - 15 May 12:37

The latest book by anarchist anthropologist David Graeber reveals the technological age as one of total bureacracy.

Cutting up the now: Sean Borodale, Frances Leviston and Sam Riviere’s new books
By Philip Maughan - 13 May 15:00

Three prize-laden upcoming poets return with second collections driving poetry into the digital future and the human past.

Meaty magic: Joanna Scanlan stars as DI Deering
No Offence is that rare thing: a truly good comedy drama
By Rachel Cooke - 12 May 13:28

Set in a Manchester police station, Paul Abbott's No Offence shines with wit and human insight.

The nourishing blood of the novelist
By Frances Wilson - 11 May 16:35

Writers are vampires who sink their fangs into other writers

The Minister of Magic isn’t even elected! Photo: Chris Jackson/Getty Images
Can wizards vote in Muggle elections? Plus other questions about wizarding democracy
By Anna Leszkiewicz - 07 May 14:30

As Rufus Scrimgeour put it: “These are dark times, there is no denying. Our world has perhaps faced no greater threat than it does today.”

Reading between the party lines: a run-down of the key books of this election
By New Statesman - 07 May 9:27

Sometimes you need more than 140 characters.

Rip it up and start again: a kindergarten remains standing on a demolition site in Shaanxi Province. Photo: Reuters
Disappearing villages: the losers in China's breakneck urbanisation
By Isabel Hilton - 06 May 10:33

So rapid has China's development been that at any given moment there are vast, empty proto-cities waiting for people.

Glasgow, from where James Kelman hails. Photo: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
A psychological adventure, Scots grit, and a village in sign language
By New Statesman - 06 May 10:22

New books by Louise Stern, James Kelman and Douglas Kennedy.

Nicholas Cage in Spike Jonze’s 2002 film “Adaptation”.
Is it possible to make a good film about writing?
By Oliver Farry - 05 May 12:21

Too often, films are very inarticulate when talking about books. 

Miller (left) and Bellow (center) in New York. Photo: © Inge Morath Foundation
When Saul Bellow and Arthur Miller were neighbours
By Leo Robson - 04 May 10:56

They crossed paths while living close together in Reno - but the two heavyweights differed more than shared.

Two women pass a bridge destroyed by Serb artillery fire (1994). Photo: ERIC CABANIS/AFP/Getty Image
Love, Sex and Other Foreign Policy Goals takes Waugh to Bosnia
By Mark Lawson - 04 May 10:50

The first novel from Thick of It writer Jesse Armstrong addresses the morality of foreign intervention with jokes, slapstick - and a student play.

Gideon and his box of tricks. Photo: Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images
Regressive politics: George Osborne wants to shrink the state to pre-1945 levels
By Peter Hain - 04 May 10:47

Mr Osborne's Economic Experiment reveals the chancellor's tricks.

Flying aces: Soviet air force officers decorated after serving in the Second World War.
From Bletchley girls to Russian aces: the forgotten women at war
By Erica Wagner - 04 May 10:46

This is real feminist history - work which was unheralded not just because it was top secret, but because women did it.

A man walks past parliament, reflected in a puddle. Photo: Oli Scarff/Getty Images
Why do so many governments achieve so little?
By Andrew Adonis - 04 May 10:44

New books by Anthony King and Michael Barber invite us to assess - and act.

Pulling the strings. Picture: Tina Modotti/AKG-Images
Rowan Williams: can we ever be in charge of our own lives?
By Rowan Williams - 04 May 10:35

The debate over freedom is a complex, extended one.

A graveyard. Photo: Public domain pictures
If the dead could talk, what would they say? The Dirty Dust gives voice to the buried
By Roy Foster - 30 April 14:10

Alan Titley's translation of Máirtín Ó Cadhain's Cré na Cille brings us a novel entirely in dialogue - and set in a graveyard.

Uneasy lies the head: a self-portrait by Bruno Schulz from The Booke of Idolatry (1920-22).
A protest against reality: the life and afterlife of Bruno Schulz
By Chris Power - 30 April 12:50

He influenced writers from Salman Rushdie to Danilo Kiš - now a new novel by Maxim Biller takes us deep into the legend of the Polish-Jewish novelist.

Dame Agatha Christie. Photo: AFP
Clever novelists know how to write a story. It’s the clever-clever ones who don’t
By Ed Smith - 30 April 12:07

Modernism's legacy seems to dominate refined taste - but you can't underestimate the power of a great story.

Blue Labour. Photograph: Christopher Furlong/Getty, colour cast New Statesman
How to win the future: why Blue Labour is the way forward
By Phillip Blond - 29 April 9:21

In a world so highly individualised, what we need is a cultural rather than an economic politics.

Civil savages? Rachel Caine’s “god of all dogs”. Photo: Matt Cardy/Getty Images
Where the wild things are: fiction that proves we're closer to nature than we think
By Erica Wagner - 29 April 8:00

Melissa Harrison's At Hawthorn Time and Sarah Hall's The Wolf Border take us to the brink of the anthropocene.

Life after death: survivors of the genocide from Sivas, central Turkey, gather in the southern Turkish city of Aintab (now Gaziantep), 1919. Photo: BRIDGEMAN IMAGES
There is no us and them: remembering the lost Armenians
By Elif Shafak - 27 April 12:30

Perhaps the most difficult word to pronounce aloud in the Turkish language is “soykirim” – genocide.

A four-day-old baby in a hospital ward. Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images
In After Birth, Elisa Albert is putting the feminist action back into motherhood
By Glosswitch - 24 April 14:56

Knowing, understanding and speaking about birth and its aftermath are clearly as important as the political narrative that surrounds it. In her novel After Birth, Elisa Albert seeks to do just that.

Voice of experience: Toni Morrison in 1977. Photo: REX
Lionel Shriver: Toni Morrison picked the wrong subject in God Help the Child
By Lionel Shriver - 23 April 17:29

Toni Morrison has plenty of laurels on which to rest - and this new novel isn't terrible. But given the choice, I'd read Beloved anyday.

The gunpowder works. Original source unknown.
Tracing the aftershocks: the explosion in Kent that was felt in East Anglia
By Colm McAuliffe - 23 April 14:14

The story of an obscure munitions disaster during the First World War meets a fragile form of biography.

No easy way: Dusty Springfield performing in 1965. Photo: Dezo Hoffmann/Rex
Good vibrations: Tracey Thorn’s new book crushes our ideas about what makes a good singer
By Jude Rogers - 23 April 12:44

Naked at the Albert Hall is a history of singing that hums with freshness and passion.

Sitting comfortably? Ed in 2010. Photo: Paul Stuart.
Ed Miliband has had mixed results as an opposition leader – but he might shine as prime minister
By Anthony Seldon - 23 April 10:47

A new book by Tim Bale takes us as close as possible to understanding the awkward enigma that is Ed.

Big fish: a Hackney market trader. Photo: Ridley Rd Portrait Project, © Kate Peters
What do you do? From financiers to fishmongers, a new book shows Britain at work
By Joe Moran - 23 April 10:45

Work is now something we are supposed to be "passionate" about. But Joanna Biggs' portraits of the British workforce show that cant and hypocrisy are as resilient as ever.

Cruel intentions: Hitchcock in London during the filming of Frenzy (1972). Photo: Rex
The fat man walks alone: how Hitchcock the ham became film's greatest artist
By Leo Robson - 23 April 7:43

Today, Hitchcock is reverred for his contribution to cinema. But his reputation as a "serious" director came late, as new biographies from Michael Wood and Peter Ackroyd reveal.

Stork fetish: our cultures encourage us to believe that the breeding instinct is universal. Photo: Bridgeman Images
Caught in the parent trap: the fierce social politics of not having children
By Rachel Cooke - 16 April 17:01

Why don't I have children? The answer is simple: I never reached the point where I wanted them.

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We are stardust: the restrained elegance of Clive James's Sentenced to Life
By John Burnside - 16 April 17:01

"The world you quit / Is staying here, so say goodbye to it."

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