Nobel Peace Prize awarded to the EU

Not quite as weird as it seems. But still pretty weird.

The 2012 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to the European Union.

The decision is not as bizarre as one might think. There is a precedent for organisations winning the prize – the international atomic energy association won in 2005, for instance – and the EU, although it is largely forgotten now, was formed with the aim of making war in Europe not just unthinkable, but materially impossible.

Its aims have certainly been achieved. The continent has gone from one which was torn apart by war twice in half a century, having undergone few years of peace in its entire history, to one which has earned an unprecedented lack of violent struggle – internally, at least.

Nonetheless, for all that the award may be appropriate in the big picture, the question as to why it was awarded now is more unclear. The past couple of years have not been the best in the EU's history, certainly, and the eurocrisis has made a break-up of the union possible for almost the first time since it was founded. Adding to the strangeness is the fact that the Peace Prize is the only one awarded by Norway, rather than Sweden – and Norway isn't even a member of the EU.

The EU flag. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Election results in Wales: Labour on course to remain the largest party

Despite a shock victory for Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood, Welsh Labour will be able to govern without a coalition.

Labour have posted good results in Wales, where the party remains on course to be the controlling force in the Welsh Assembly.

At the time of writing, Carwyn Jones’ party has 24 of the 40 constituency seats, with Plaid Cymru a distant second on 6 and the Conservatives on 5. Among Labour’s notable holds was Gower, which the party lost narrowly at a Westminster level in the 2015 general election by just 27 votes.

There was a surprise victory for Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood in Rhondda, where she defeated Labour cabinet member Leighton Andrews with a swing of 24 per cent. Speaking about the result, a spokesperson for Welsh Labour said:

“The Rhondda result is a really tough for us – we’ve lost a great Minister and one of the most respected politicians in Wales. Clearly the huge national profile afforded to Leanne Wood has had an impact, and Plaid seem to have won this seat at the cost of making progress anywhere else in Wales.

“The other results so far have been good. In particular where we are fighting the Tories it shows the local campaigns have been successful.”

Welsh Liberal Democrat leader Kirsty Williams held on to her seat in Brecon and Radnorshire, while Ukip have yet to win any seats (although they are likely to get a few on the regional list).