NBC cuts London bombings tribute because it is "not tailored to a US audience"

Network airs interview with Michael Phelps instead

NBC is the American channel which won, for $1.8bn, the rights to broadcast the Olympics in the US. Unfortunately, on the first day, they didn't do a great job of it.

The Opening Ceremony included a tribute to the victims of terror; specifically, to the 52 people killed in the London bombings, which happened the day after the Olympics were awarded to the city. With that victory itself happening hot on the heels of the enormous Live 8 gala, it was a hugely emotional week for Londoners, and something which few will forget.

To pay tribute to it, Danny Boyle, the director, included a mellow – aurally, if not when it came to choreography – section of the opening ceremony, which was explicitly announced as a memorial, and was, along with the silence for the war dead, a time for reflection.

Unless you were watching in the US, where NBC cut away to a pre-recorded interview with swimmer Michael Phelps.

Their explanation for doing so? According to USA Today:

When asked why NBC didn't show the memorial, NBC spokesman Greg Hughes on Saturday said only that "our programming is tailored for the U.S. audience. It's a tribute to (opening ceremony producer) Danny Boyle that it required so little editing." [emphasis mine]

Just imagine if the BBC had cut away from a tribute to 9/11, or even the Aurora shooting. NBC apparently thinks "basic decency" isn't tailored for Americans.

Oh, and to add insult to injury, their commentators didn't know who Tim Berners-Lee was.

Oh dear, NBC.

The NBC peacock. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.