Good vibes for your friends and family

Tom Ravenscroft's music blog.

I have an abundance of awesome new vibes this week, more than I know what to do with. It can weigh one down, so I'm going to offload some of them here. You can take them with you and do as you will -- perhaps you can give them to family members or friends who you feel need a vibe change.

Eric Copeland, who some may know as the front man of Black Dice and others for hanging out and making noise with a member of the Animal Collective, has released a solo 7" called "Whorehouse Blues". It is a seriously heavy thing: "a 1950s slow dance sung by a mean villian through a broken radio" is the best way to describe it. I very much hope he carries on in this vein.

 

Pony, a Canadian who now lives in the Netherlands and is sometimes called Audrey, has an album called (I Forgot) to Turn You On, which is a bit magical, like a fairy tale. It's very pretty and distant-sounding. My favourite track, "That I Must Rise", is a slow and lazy-sounding series of out-of-tune piano chords that, for some reason, makes me think of a cartoon character trying to walk through treacle. That's a pretty odd vibe.

 

 

 

 

 

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Why a Keeping Up with the Kardashians cartoon would make genuinely brilliant TV

The Kardashians are their own greatest satirists.

You’ve seen Keeping Up with the Kardashians, Kourtney and Kim Take Kyoto, and Kylie and Kendall Klarify Kommunications Kontracts, but the latest Kardashian show might take a step away from reality. Yes, Kartoon Kardashians could be on the way. According to TMZ, an animated cartoon is the next Kardashian television property we can expect: the gossip website reports that Kris Jenner saw Harvey Weinstein’s L.A. production company earlier this month for a pitch meeting.

It’s easy to imagine the dramas the animated counterparts of the Kardashians might have: arguments over who gets the last clear plastic salad bowl? Moral dilemmas over whether or not to wear something other than Balenciaga to a high profile fashion event? Outrage over the perceived betrayals committed by their artisanal baker?

If this gives you déjà vu, it might be because of a video that went viral over a year ago made using The Sims: a blisteringly accurate parody of Keeping Up with the Kardashians that sees the three sisters have a melodramatic argument about soda.

It’s hysterical because it clings onto the characteristics of the show: scenes opening with utter banalities, sudden dramatic music coinciding with close-ups of each family member’s expressions, a bizarre number of shots of people who aren’t speaking, present tense confessionals, Kim’s ability to do an emotional 0-60, and Kourtney’s monotonous delivery.

But if the Kardashians, both as a reality TV show and celebrity figures, are ripe for ridicule, no one is more aware of it than the family themselves. They’ve shared teasing memes and posted their own self-referential jokes on their social channels, while Kim’s Kimoji app turned mocking viral pictures into self-depreciating in-jokes for her fans. And the show itself has a level of self-awareness often misinterpreted as earnestness - how else could this moment of pure cinema have made it to screen?

The Kardashians are their own greatest satirists, and they’ve perfected the art of making fun of themselves before anyone else can. So there’s a good chance that this new cartoon won’t be a million miles away from “Soda Drama”. It might even be brilliant.

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.