In this week's New Statesman: The last Tsar

Vladimir Putin's lust for power | Is it ever okay to write about your divorce? | Michael Rosen on ch

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This week's cover story profiles Vladimir Putin and his lust for power. Putin has stifled dissent throughout his political life, says Oliver Bullough. But as he prepares for another presidential term, Russia's disaffected middle class are no longer willing to stay silent. Also in the mix is Evgeny Lebedev, who writes this week's Diary, on Russia, the Guardian's struggles, and why he loves Blackpool. Elsewhere, Sophie Elmhirst interviews the Russian property magnate Sergei Polonsky.

The magazine also contains a profile of Rachel Cusk, whose new book Aftermath: on Marriage and Separation has caused a stir with its exposition of personal pain. In the Critics section, the book is reviewed by Jane Shilling. We pose the question: is it ever okay to write about your divorce? Meanwhile, Rob Brown discusses Scotland's Irish question. During the years of the Troubles, Catholics looked up to Labour as their protector. But all that has now changed, to the advantage of the SNP.

Elsewhere, Rafael Behr says that Ed Miliband needs to show us what he believes, Mehdi Hasan argues against western intervention, and Norman Lamont explains why the west's policy on Iran has failed. In the Critics lead, Michael Rosen asks why children's authors are rarely asked for their opinion on how to get children reading -- a serious oversight, since they know far more than politicians.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Donald Trump is definitely the Republican presidential candidate

Previously unpledged delegates have revealed their support for the billionaire, taking him past the delegate tally required.

Donald Trump has attained the number of delegates required to become the Republican Party’s presidential nominee. According to Associated Press, Trump has reached 1,238 delegates, one more than needed to secure his place as the Republican candidate in November’s general election.

Trump has been the presumptive Republican nominee since early May, when his last remaining rivals Ted Cruz and John Kasich suspended their campaigns. Still, with five primaries still to come and some delegates not required to reveal their preference until the Republican national convention in July, Trump was not quite over the line.

Associated Press has calculated that Trump is in fact now secure as nominee after speaking to previously unpledged delegates who revealed their support for the bombastic billionaire. Trump, whose candidacy was initially seen as a publicity stunt, has so far come top in 34 of the primary and caucus contests.  

On the Democratic side, Bernie Sanders has vowed to continue to pursue the party’s presidential nomination to the party’s convention, where delegates are officially allocated and the party’s candidate declared. However, Sanders currently has the support of just 1,539 delegates compared to Hillary Clinton’s 2,305, with 2,383 needed for the nomination. 

Henry Zeffman writes about politics and is the winner of the Anthony Howard Award 2015.