How Ed should handle McCluskey

Miliband should condemn McCluskey's Olympics threat but he can't "rein him in".

On one level, Unite leader Len McCluskey's threat to disrupt the Olympics is unsurprising. If you oppose all of the cuts (as McCluskey does), why not strike at the moment of maximum inconvenience? The trade union head tells the Guardian:

The attacks that are being launched on public-sector workers at the moment are so deep and ideological that the idea the world should arrive in London and have these wonderful Olympic Games as though everything is nice and rosy in the garden is unthinkable.

It's important to note, as few have, that this was not an unprompted intervention. McCluskey was asked by the paper if he had "talked about" the possibility of strike action during the Olympics and it's unsurprising, at this stage, that he's not willing to take any options off the table. That is standard negotiating practice.

What make his intervention significant is his standing in the labour movement. As general secretary of Unite he leads the country's biggest trade union and Labour's biggest donor, responsible for a quarter of all donations to the party. And, lest we forget, had it not been for his union, among others, David Miliband, not Ed, would now be wearing the crown.

Nick Clegg, a long-standing critic of the unions, has already called on Ed Miliband to "rein in" McCluskey, something that is neither possible nor desirable for the Labour leader to do. As the democratically-elected head of a trade union, McCluskey should answer to no one but his members.

What Miliband can and should do is simply condemn the Unite leader. Unlike Tony Blair, Miliband has never sought to define himself by picking fights with his own party. But that doesn't mean that he shouldn't respond when union leaders speak out.

Tessa Jowell, Labour's shadow Olympics minister, has already issued an unambiguous statement:

No one in our country looking forward to the Olympics, no athlete preparing, and none of our thousands of potential visitors, would understand or sympathise with any disruption to the Olympic Games.

If this is a negotiation it should take place in private. Unions and employers should get together and sort it out without threats or disruption to Britain's Olympics.

Those who say that Miliband cannot afford to alienate Unite, his party's biggest paymaster, should remember that, even at the height of Blairism, the unions continued to pay the bills.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Theresa May knows she's talking nonsense - here's why she's doing it

The Prime Minister's argument increases the sense that this is a time to "lend" - in her words - the Tories your vote.

Good morning.  Angela Merkel and Theresa May are more similar politicians than people think, and that holds true for Brexit too. The German Chancellor gave a speech yesterday, and the message: Brexit means Brexit.

Of course, the emphasis is slightly different. When May says it, it's about reassuring the Brexit elite in SW1 that she isn't going to backslide, and anxious Remainers and soft Brexiteers in the country that it will work out okay in the end.

When Merkel says it, she's setting out what the EU wants and the reality of third country status outside the European Union.  She's also, as with May, tilting to her own party and public opinion in Germany, which thinks that the UK was an awkward partner in the EU and is being even more awkward in the manner of its leaving.

It's a measure of how poor the debate both during the referendum and its aftermath is that Merkel's bland statement of reality - "A third-party state - and that's what Britain will be - can't and won't be able to have the same rights, let alone a better position than a member of the European Union" - feels newsworthy.

In the short term, all this helps Theresa May. Her response - delivered to a carefully-selected audience of Leeds factory workers, the better to avoid awkward questions - that the EU is "ganging up" on Britain is ludicrous if you think about it. A bloc of nations acting in their own interest against their smaller partners - colour me surprised!

But in terms of what May wants out of this election - a massive majority that gives her carte blanche to implement her agenda and puts Labour out of contention for at least a decade - it's a great message. It increases the sense that this is a time to "lend" - in May's words - the Tories your vote. You may be unhappy about the referendum result, you may usually vote Labour - but on this occasion, what's needed is a one-off Tory vote to make Brexit a success.

May's message is silly if you pay any attention to how the EU works or indeed to the internal politics of the EU27. That doesn't mean it won't be effective.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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