PMQs review: Miliband's finest performance

The Labour leader finally found his voice today.

Does Ed Miliband, like Tony Blair and David Cameron, perform best when his back is against the wall? On the basis of today's PMQs, the answer is yes. This was the Labour leader's finest performance for months. Rarely has he sounded so passionate and authentic on the economy. He tore into Cameron and George Osborne ("a byword for self-satisfied smug complacency") with cathartic force and the Prime Minister was visibly unnerved.

And why wouldn't he be? The economy is shrinking, unemployment is heading towards three million and the national debt has reached £1 trillion. Yet as recently as June 2010, Osborne was promising a "a steady and sustained economic recovery, with low inflation and falling unemployment". Cameron reeled off a litany of traditional excuses ("the overhang of the debt and the deficit", "higher food and fuel prices", "the crisis in the eurozone") but was unable to rebut the central charge that his policies have only made things worse. He accused Miliband of failing to take responsibility for Labour's "mess" but soon he will be forced to take responsibility for his own.

Some will question why Miliband chose to split his questions - the final three were on the NHS - when he had Cameron on the ropes. But it was the right decision. The NHS, which, lest we forget, employs 1.4 million people, is once again becoming a headache for the coalition and Miliband seized an opportunity to heighten the pain. Noting that the Prime Minister had boasted last September that his reforms were supported by GPs and nurses, the Labour leader asked him to provide "an update on the support for his bill from the medical profession."

With the British Medical Association, the Royal College of GPs, the Royal College of Nursing, the Royal College of Midwives and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy all now calling for the bill to be dropped, Cameron could only cite the support of a lone GP in Doncaster. "What is good for Doncaster, is good for the rest of the country," he declared in a farcical riff.

The reality, as Miliband said, is that 98 per cent of GPs want the bill withdrawn. Once again denouncing Cameron's "arrogance" (a charge that has clearly been focus-grouped), he urged the PM to keep at least one promise and put an end to this "top-down reorganisation". Cameron, visibly beaten, scorned Labour for caving into the "trade unions" but he may yet regret picking a fight with the most powerful of them all.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

#Match4Lara
Show Hide image

#Match4Lara: Lara has found her match, but the search for mixed-race donors isn't over

A UK blood cancer charity has seen an "unprecedented spike" in donors from mixed race and ethnic minority backgrounds since the campaign started. 

Lara Casalotti, the 24-year-old known round the world for her family's race to find her a stem cell donor, has found her match. As long as all goes ahead as planned, she will undergo a transplant in March.

Casalotti was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia in December, and doctors predicted that she would need a stem cell transplant by April. As I wrote a few weeks ago, her Thai-Italian heritage was a stumbling block, both thanks to biology (successful donors tend to fit your racial profile), and the fact that mixed-race people only make up around 3 per cent of international stem cell registries. The number of non-mixed minorities is also relatively low. 

That's why Casalotti's family launched a high profile campaign in the US, Thailand, Italy and the US to encourage more people - especially those from mixed or minority backgrounds - to register. It worked: the family estimates that upwards of 20,000 people have signed up through the campaign in less than a month.

Anthony Nolan, the blood cancer charity, also reported an "unprecedented spike" of donors from black, Asian, ethcnic minority or mixed race backgrounds. At certain points in the campaign over half of those signing up were from these groups, the highest proportion ever seen by the charity. 

Interestingly, it's not particularly likely that the campaign found Casalotti her match. Patient confidentiality regulations protect the nationality and identity of the donor, but Emily Rosselli from Anthony Nolan tells me that most patients don't find their donors through individual campaigns: 

 It’s usually unlikely that an individual finds their own match through their own campaign purely because there are tens of thousands of tissue types out there and hundreds of people around the world joining donor registers every day (which currently stand at 26 million).

Though we can't know for sure, it's more likely that Casalotti's campaign will help scores of people from these backgrounds in future, as it has (and may continue to) increased donations from much-needed groups. To that end, the Match4Lara campaign is continuing: the family has said that drives and events over the next few weeks will go ahead. 

You can sign up to the registry in your country via the Match4Lara website here.

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.