50 years of PMQs: the best moments

The best videos, including "Stalin to Mr Bean", "we saved the world" and "calm down, dear!"

This week marks 50 years since the first PMQs (Harold Macmillan vs. Hugh Gaitskell, since you ask). So, by way of celebration, here are some of the most memorable moments from the weekly joust.

Blair on Major: "weak, weak, weak"

Here, from his clashes with John Major, are two of Tony Blair's most artful put-downs. In the first clip from 25 May 1995, the young Labour leader taunts Major's inability to control his anti-European backbenchers. "There is one very big difference - I lead my party, he follows his." Major later described it in his memoirs as "the best one-liner he ever used against me".

In the second from 30 January 1997 (again concerning Europe), Blair brands Major "weak, weak, weak" for failing to impose a joint line on the euro.

Cameron to Blair: "you were the future once"

And here's the "heir to Blair" in action at his first PMQs, telling his rival "you were the future once" and reprimanding the Labour chief whip for "shouting like a child".

Cable on Brown: "Stalin to Mr Bean"

It was Andrew Turnball, the former head of the civil service, who declared in March 2007 that Gordon Brown operated with "Stalinist ruthlessness". But eight months later, after a run on Northern Rock, the loss of 25 million child benefit records and another donations scandal, the description no longer seemed so appropriate. Vince Cable, then acting leader of the Lib Dems, caught the mood when he quipped that Brown had gone "from Stalin to Mr Bean" in a matter of weeks.

Brown: "we saved the world"

New York Times columnist Paul Krugman memorably asked: "Has Gordon Brown, the British prime minister, saved the world financial system?" and answered in the affirmative. But Krugman's praise appeared to have gone to Brown's head when he told the Commons: "we saved the world". His humourless response (Blair would have quipped "we'll get round to that later") only made matters worse.

Cameron to Angela Eagle: "calm down, dear!"

Finally, from earlier this year, here's Cameron's ill-advised riposte to Angela Eagle. For an idea of how the remark went down with the Lib Dems, just contrast Nick Clegg's stony face with George Osborne's guffawing.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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