Gaddafi killed, say Libyan officials

Major news agencies reporting that the former dictator has died after being arrested. Warning: conta

The image above --taken on a mobile phone -- appears to show Muammar Gaddafi being arrested in Sirte.

It is now being reported by major news agencies including Reuters that the former dictator has died of his injuries. Sky News has played a video which appears to show Gaddafi's body being dragged through the streets of Sirte.

This comes after revolutionaries took Sirte, Gaddafi's hometown and the final stronghold of his loyalists.

Earlier today, the Information Centre for the Misrata Military Council said:

Now in contact with our correspondent at the front of the Sirte. The tyrant Muammar Gaddafi was arrested. God is great and thank God.

Following this, the National Transitional Council's information minister, Mahmoud Shammam, appeared on al-Jazeera. He stopped short of confirming the claim -- which was being widely reported on Libyan TV -- but alluded to the rumour:

I think we can say that Sirte is liberated ...I think the celebrations are going on right now. Also there's big talk about some big fish on their way to Misrata. I cannot confirm anything but people over there are talking they caught a big fish.

Asked about the NTC's intentions if Gaddafi had been captured, he said:

We are going to put him in front of the court, we're not going to hang him in the street. We are going to give him the fair trial he never gave the Libyan people. We hope that we are catching some big names so we can put them in the court and let the people have the last word on their fate ...I think every Libyan wants to see Gaddafi stand trial.

Abdel Majid, another NTC official, appeared to confirm the capture by telling Reuters that Gaddafi was injured in both legs.

UPDATE - 12.56: Al-Jazeera and Reuters are both reporting that Gaddafi has been killed.

 

 

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

Getty
Show Hide image

John McDonnell accuses Labour of “rigged purge” of Corbyn supporters

The shadow chancellor criticises the party's national executive committee for its expulsion of members and supporters from the leadership election.

John McDonnell has accused Labour of targeting Jeremy Corbyn's supporters in a "purge" of those allowed to vote in the leadership election.

"Labour party members will not accept what appears to be a rigged purge of Jeremy Corbyn supporters", the shadow chancellor wrote. "The conduct of this election must be fair and even-handed."

McDonnell, who is Corbyn's campaign manager, added: "I am writing to Labour's general secretary Iain McNicol to demand that members and supporters who are suspended or lose their voting rights are given clear information about why action has been taken and a timely opportunity to challenge the decision. In particular, the specification of particular terms of abuse to exclude Labour party members from voting should not be applied retrospectively."

The statement follows the suspension of Bakers' Union boss Ronnie Draper from voting in the election, an action Draper attributed to unspecified previous social media posts. Labour's national executive committee has not commented on the reasons for his suspension.

"While Ronnie, a supporter of Jeremy Corbyn, has been denied his say in Labour's elecion, no action is being taken over the Labour peer, Lord Sainsbury, who has given more than £2m to support the Liberal Democrats," McDonnell said. "And no action has been taken against Michael Foster, the Labour party member who abused Jeremy Corbyn's supporters and staff as Nazi stormtroopers in the Daily Mail."

McDonnell's statement adds to an already febrile mood over the election, which sees Corbyn pitted against challenger Owen Smith. A week ago, a group of Labour grandees signed a letter condemning "intolerable" attacks on party staff - who are not allowed to respond to allegations made against them. The latest statement will be seen as a warning shot to general secretary Iain McNicol, who the leadership feel has consistently interpreted the party's rules to Corbyn's disadvantage. 

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.