Fox hunting

What the papers are saying about the beleaguered defence secretary.

With the Prime Minister asking for the preliminary findings of an inquiry into Liam Fox's working relationship with Adam Werritty to be on his desk tomorrow morning, the position of the defence secretary looks precarious. This morning, the Observer produces video footage of Fox's meeting with the president of Sri Lanka last year at which Werritty was present, and which appears to contradict the defence secretary's earlier insistence that his friend and former flatmate had never attended any meetings with representatives of foreign governments.

The press pack has the scent of its quarry in its nostrils. Here's what the papers are saying about Mr Fox today.

Observer

Emails and video footage pile pressure on beleaguered Liam Fox: Film of Sri Lankan meeting and email exchange between friend and businessman undermine defence secretary's prior claims.

Sunday Times (£)

Cameron demands truth as Fox fights to keep defence job: The prime minister has launched an investigation into whether Liam Fox compromised national security by giving special access to his best man.

Sunday Telegraph

Liam Fox: I have nothing to hide over links with aide: Liam Fox has mounted a fightback in a bid to save his Cabinet job in a row over his working relationship with his self-styled adviser, Adam Werritty.

The questions Liam Fox must answer about his friend Adam Werritty.

Independent on Sunday

Fox adviser is involved in arms deals, says MoD source.

Jonathan Derbyshire is Managing Editor of Prospect. He was formerly Culture Editor of the New Statesman.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.