A new bombshell in the phone hacking scandal

Former NoW royal editor Clive Goodman alleges that phone hacking was "widely discussed" at editorial

Just when you thought the phone hacking scandal had reached a lull, Clive Goodman's bombshell of a letter turns up. The letter (which you can read here) was released this afternoon by the DCMS select committee and is potentially devastating for Andy Coulson's defence. Goodman alleges that phone hacking was "widely discussed" at editorial meetings until Coulson banned "explicit reference" to it; that Coulson offered to let him keep his job if he did not "implicate" the paper; and that his own hacking was carried out with the "full knowledge and support" of other senior NoW journalists (whose names have been redacted at the request of Scotland Yard). It's yet more evidence of a gigantic cover up.

Goodman's missive could also prove disastrous for Murdoch consigliere Les Hinton, who received a copy but failed to pass it to the police, and who told the select committee just days later (on 6 March 2007) that the tabloid's former royal editor was "the only person" involved in phone hacking. The letter, which is addressed to News International's director of human resources, Daniel Cloke, is dated 2 March 2007 and was sent shortly after Goodman had served a four-month prison sentence for phone hacking. It was intended as an appeal against Hinton's decision to dismiss him for "gross misconduct".

Significantly, as the Guardian's Nick Davies reports, two versions of Goodman's letter were supplied to the committee. One, supplied by law firm Harbottle & Lewis, was redacted to remove the names of NoW journalists, at the police's request. The other, which was supplied by News International, was redacted to also remove all references to hacking being discussed at editorial meetings.

There's also more bad news for the Murdochs themselves. In a separate letter, Harbottle & Lewis criticises the pair's evidence to the select committee as "hard to credit" and "self-serving". The law firm points out that its investigation was limited to whether Goodman hacked phones with the knowledge of other journalists, not whether "general" criminality took place at the tabloid. Thus, it was dishonest of the Murdochs to present a letter from the firm as evidence that News International had received a clean bill of health.

The select committee, which accurately described the evidence as "devastating", has said that James Murdoch is "likely" to be recalled but that Rupert Murdoch is not. In an allusion to Murdoch senior's ignorance and/or amnesia, Tom Watson said that the "devil is in the detail".

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Jeremy Corbyn may be a Eurosceptic, but he still appeals to the values of many Remainers

He reassures Labour MPs defending majorities in heavily pro-EU areas that things will be OK.

There are two facts about Brexit that everyone seems to forget every few weeks: the first is that Jeremy Corbyn is a Eurosceptic. The second is that the first fact doesn't really matter.

The Labour leader's hostility to the European project is back in the news after he told Andrew Marr that the United Kingdom's membership of the single market was inextricably linked with its EU membership, and added for good measure that the “wholesale importation” of people from Eastern and Central Europe had been used to “destroy” the conditions of workers, particularly in the construction industry.

As George Eaton observes on Twitter, Corbyn voted against the creation of the single market in 1986 (and the Maastricht Treaty, and the Lisbon Treaty, and so on and so on). It would be a bigger shock if the Labour leader weren't advocating for a hard exit from the European Union.

Here's why it doesn't matter: most Labour MPs agree with him. There is not a large number of Labour votes in the House of Commons that would switch from opposing single market membership to supporting it if Corbyn changed his mind. (Perhaps five or so from the frontbenches and the same again on the backbenches.)

There is a way that Corbyn matters: in reassuring Labour MPs defending majorities in heavily pro-Remain areas that things will be OK. Imagine for a moment the reaction among the liberal left if, say, Yvette Cooper or Stephen Kinnock talked about the “wholesale importation” of people or claimed that single market membership and EU membership were one and the same. Labour MPs in big cities and university towns would be a lot more nervous about bleeding votes to the Greens or the Liberal Democrats were they not led by a man who for all his longstanding Euroscepticism appeals to the values of so many Remain voters.

Corbyn matters because he provides electoral insurance against a position that Labour MPs are minded to follow anyway. And that, far more than the Labour leader's view on the Lisbon Treaty, is why securing a parliamentary majority for a soft exit from the European Union is so hard. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.