Berlusconi not to run in 2013 election

The beleaguered Italian prime minister has said he will step down as leader.

In an interview published today in the Italian newspaper, La Reppublica, Silvio Berlusconi has announced that he will not be running in Italy's upcoming elections.

Asked if he would be putting himself forward as a candidate for election, he replied: "Absolutely not".

"I would like to leave now, really, but I won't," he said.

In his place, he named his justice minister and head of his People of Freedom (PdL) party, Angelino Alfano, as his potential successor.

"The candidate for premier on the centre right will be Alfano. If I could, I would give it up now... in any case I won't be the candidate for prime ministr in the next election... at 77 I can't still be the president of the council".

He offered his full support to Alfano, saying he was "the only [politician] who doesn't play games".

The 74-year old media-mogul and effective tyrant has suffered several political drawbacks in recent months, including an unprecedented defeat in regional elections on 31 May and in four referendum votes on 13 June. Abroad, his image has long been sullied by a long list of salacious allegations, and he is currently being investigated on corruption charges and for allegedly paying an under-age prostitute for sex.

"When will you stop attacking me?" He whined to the newspaper. "Try to be a little more balanced. If you can."

But news of his departure, however welcome, should be taken with a healthy degree of scepticism. After all, he is not a politician best known for his command of the truth.

Emanuelle Degli Esposti is the editor and founder of The Arab Review, an online journal covering arts and culture in the Arab world. She also works as a freelance journalist specialising in the politics of the Middle East.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.