The scandal continues

New allegations against the News of the World suggest the newspaper may have targeted the families o

It seems there are no depths to which the News of the World will not sink. The news that the parents of Soham murder victims, Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman, were contacted by the police has raised suspicions that they, too, have been victims of the hacking scandal.

And if that weren't bad enough, it has now emerged that the bereaved relatives of the 7/7 terrorist attacks may also have been targeted.

Graham Foulkes, whose son David was killed in the Edgware Road blast, confirmed that was contacted by officers on Tuesday after his details were discovered on a list as part of the police inquiry into hacking claims. He has called the revelations "extraordinarily distressing", and condemned the practices of journalists seeking an exclusive story:

"The thought that somebody may have been listening to [us] just looking for a cheap headline is just horredous."

On Tuesday, new evidence came to light of payments made to senior officers of the Metropolitan Police by the News of the World between 2003 and 2007, the period in which Andy Coulson served as the paper's editor. Coulson admitted as much in 2003.

Calls for Rebekah Brooks's resignation have intensified over the new revelations, with David Cameron and Ed Milliband also weighing in to discredit their former chum -- who they seemed to have no problem cosying up to at Rupert Murdoch's summer party in June.

Emanuelle Degli Esposti is the editor and founder of The Arab Review, an online journal covering arts and culture in the Arab world. She also works as a freelance journalist specialising in the politics of the Middle East.

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
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Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

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