Trump and Palin’s pizza summit

“I’d love her to run,” Trump says after the pair meet for dinner in New York.

The latest stop on Sarah Palin's One Nation bus tour of the United States was Donald Trump's triplex apartment in New York. After meeting at Trump Tower, the pair shared a pepperoni pizza in Times Square.

Asked if he would support a Palin candidacy, The Donald replied: "She didn't ask me for that. She came up as friends . . . But I will tell you, she's a great woman and a terrific woman, and a good friend." He added: "I'd love her to run."

To which Palin mischievously replied: "We both agree that competition is good and the more folks in that primary, the better." It was yet another hint that she's preparing the ground for a bid.

Palin certainly sounded a lot like a candidate when, after she was asked what she and Trump have common, she replied: "A desire to see our economy get put back on the right track, making sure that we have a balanced trade arrangement with other countries across this world so that Americans can have our jobs, our industries, our manufacturing again.

"That's what built this country. It was manufacturing and exploiting responsibly our natural resources. We can do that again if we make sensible decisions."

Surely she could have just said that they both like pizza? Palin is expected to visit Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty this morning.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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LISTEN: Boris Johnson has a meltdown in car crash interview on the Queen’s Speech

“Hang on a second…errr…I’m sorry, I’m sorry.”

“Hang on a second,” Boris Johnson sighed. On air, you could hear the desperate rustling of his briefing notes (probably a crumpled Waitrose receipt with “crikey” written on it) and him burbling for an answer.

Over and over again, on issues of racism, working-class inequality, educational opportunity, mental healthcare and housing, the Foreign Secretary failed to answer questions about the content of his own government’s Queen’s Speech, and how it fails to tackle “burning injustices” (in Theresa May’s words).

With each new question, he floundered more – to the extent that BBC Radio 4 PM’s presenter Eddie Mair snapped: “It’s not a Two Ronnies sketch; you can’t answer the question before last.”

But why read your soon-to-be predecessor’s Queen’s Speech when you’re busy planning your own, eh?

Your mole isn’t particularly surprised at this poor performance. Throughout the election campaign, Tory politicians – particularly cabinet secretaries – gave interview after interview riddled with gaffes.

These performances were somewhat overlooked by a political world set on humiliating shadow home secretary Diane Abbott, who has been struggling with ill health. Perhaps if commentators had less of an anti-Abbott agenda – and noticed the car crash performances the Tories were repeatedly giving and getting away with it – the election result would have been less of a surprise.

I'm a mole, innit.

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