Boris undermines Osborne's austerity argument

Mayor of London points out that "Greek austerity measures are making the economy worse".

Even by his own high standards, Boris Johnson is on combative form this morning. The Mayor of London uses his regular Telegraph column to urge EU leaders to let Greece default on its debts and force it to leave the euro, while in a piece for the Sun, he launches an assault on Ken Clarke's sentencing plans. "Soft is the perfect way to enjoy French cheese, but not how we should approach punishing criminals," he writes.

But it's a line in his Telegraph column that really stands out: "The trouble is that the Greek austerity measures are making the economy worse." It's a point that Ed Balls and others have made frequently in recent months but it's not one that you'll hear from George Osborne, for the simple reason that it contradicts his claim that spending cuts are a precondition for growth.

The austerity measures adopted by Ireland, Portugal (which went one better than Osborne and raised VAT twice) and Greece have exacerbated, rather than diminished, their economic problems. As Balls argued in his LSE lecture last week: "[W]hat they [Portugal], Ireland and Greece have all discovered - just like Argentina, Brazil and Turkey before them - is that it doesn't matter how much they cut spending or how much they raise taxes; if they can't create jobs and growth, their debt and deficit problems get even worse and market confidence falls further still."

Similarly, in Britain, rather than increasing growth, Osborne's austerity agenda has destroyed it. The economy, which grew by 1.8 per cent over Q2 and Q3 2010, has not grown for the last six months. Britain, which was at the top end of the European growth league table, is now fourth from bottom, with only Greece, Portugal and Denmark below it.

Yet according to Osborne's doctrine of "expasionary fiscal contraction", the reverse should have happened. As the state contracts, the economy should expand. But with consumer spending still depressed and the banks not lending enough, where will growth come from if not from active government? Britain, like Greece, cannot cut its way out of stagnation.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.