Immigrants must learn English, says David Cameron – while cutting funding for lessons

The Prime Minister’s speech indicates that he cares less about integration than about reaching out t

Hot on the heels of his controversial address on multiculturalism in Munich in February, David Cameron is set to deliver another hard-hitting speech, this one specifically on immigration.

He will criticise the "largest influx" ever of immigrants in British history and emphasise the need for immigrants to speak English:

Real integration takes time. That's why, when there have been significant numbers of new people arriving in neighbourhoods perhaps not able to speak the same language as those living there, on occasions not really wanting or even willing to integrate, that has created a kind of discomfort and disjointedness in some neighbourhoods.

There is rather a cruel irony in this, given that the government will be drastically cutting funding for English as a Second Language (Esol) courses from September this year.

Under new rules, free places will be limited to students who are on jobseeker's allowance or employment support allowance – benefits paid to those actively seeking work.

At present, people who receive other benefits, such as housing benefit, income support or tax credits are also eligible for free lessons. From September, this will no longer be the case. State funding for Esol courses within the workplace will also end, leaving employers to pay.

The Institute of Race Relations noted in December:

There is concern that these changes are being introduced with no evidence of prior consultation, and without any assessment of their impact on people from migrant communities.

It is widely acknowledged that English language proficiency is crucial to participation in the labour market, for accessing services, and to functioning independently in everyday life. In consequence, the effects of cutting language provision will be widely felt. Early local impact assessments indicate cuts in core provision of up to 50 per cent.

Newspaper reports of Cameron's speech have focused on a widening gulf in the language used by the two coalition parties on this subject (a senior Lib Dem has described the tone of the speech as "appalling"). However, this basic contradiction indicates that Cameron cares less about encouraging integration than reaching out to the core Conservative vote with hardline rhetoric ahead of the local elections.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Who will win the Copeland by-election?

Labour face a tricky task in holding onto the seat. 

What’s the Copeland by-election about? That’s the question that will decide who wins it.

The Conservatives want it to be about the nuclear industry, which is the seat’s biggest employer, and Jeremy Corbyn’s long history of opposition to nuclear power.

Labour want it to be about the difficulties of the NHS in Cumbria in general and the future of West Cumberland Hospital in particular.

Who’s winning? Neither party is confident of victory but both sides think it will be close. That Theresa May has visited is a sign of the confidence in Conservative headquarters that, win or lose, Labour will not increase its majority from the six-point lead it held over the Conservatives in May 2015. (It’s always more instructive to talk about vote share rather than raw numbers, in by-elections in particular.)

But her visit may have been counterproductive. Yes, she is the most popular politician in Britain according to all the polls, but in visiting she has added fuel to the fire of Labour’s message that the Conservatives are keeping an anxious eye on the outcome.

Labour strategists feared that “the oxygen” would come out of the campaign if May used her visit to offer a guarantee about West Cumberland Hospital. Instead, she refused to answer, merely hyping up the issue further.

The party is nervous that opposition to Corbyn is going to supress turnout among their voters, but on the Conservative side, there is considerable irritation that May’s visit has made their task harder, too.

Voters know the difference between a by-election and a general election and my hunch is that people will get they can have a free hit on the health question without risking the future of the nuclear factory. That Corbyn has U-Turned on nuclear power only helps.

I said last week that if I knew what the local paper would look like between now and then I would be able to call the outcome. Today the West Cumbria News & Star leads with Downing Street’s refusal to answer questions about West Cumberland Hospital. All the signs favour Labour. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.