Why Britain is not Portugal

George Osborne is wrong to argue that Portugal’s woes make the case for his spending cuts.

Demonstrating once again that he is much better at politics than he is at economics, George Osborne has cited Portugal's request for an EU bailout as further evidence that those opposed to his excessive spending cuts are playing "Russian roulette" with Britain's national sovereignty.

"Today, of all days, we can see the risks that would face Britain if we were not dealing with our debts and paying off our national credit card. These risks are not imaginary," he said.

What the Chancellor refuses to acknowledge is that Britain, unlike Portugal, Greece and Ireland, can afford to meet its debts over a sustained period of time (even under his plans, debt will be 68.8 per cent of GDP in 2014-2015). As Duncan Weldon points out, the average maturity of UK government debt is currently around 14 years, while Portugal's is 6.8.

Indeed, the Barclays Capital Fiscal Vulnerability Index (see Table 3.1 of the IFS Green Budget), ranks the UK first for public debt duration and as joint first on the percentage of borrowing that is in domestic currency (leaving it less exposed to the foreign bond markets).

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Britain's large structural deficit means that its overall rating is worse, but even then we're ranked 32nd, next to Japan (31st) and the United States (30th), and above India (35), France (39), Poland (40), Spain (42) and Italy (51). What's more, Osborne's premature cuts and the resultant collapse in economic growth have prompted the Office for Budget Responsibility to revise its borrowing forecasts up by £44.5bn. The Chancellor may claim that Labour lacks a "credible deficit reduction plan" but, without growth, so does he.

There is, however, one big similarity between Portugal and the UK. They were both among just five EU countries to suffer negative growth in the final quarter of 2010 (the others were Greece, Ireland and Denmark).

This week's economic survey by the British Chambers of Commerce suggests that the situation may be even worse than thought. According to the BCC, the economy may have grown by just 0.1-0.2 per cent in the six months to March.

Osborne's fixation on deficit reduction, rather than growth, means that he deserves neither and will lose both.

UPDATE: The excellent Will Straw points out that the OECD's new report includes even more evidence that Britain is not Portugal.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Will Jeremy Corbyn stand down if Labour loses the general election?

Defeat at the polls might not be the end of Corbyn’s leadership.

The latest polls suggest that Labour is headed for heavy defeat in the June general election. Usually a general election loss would be the trigger for a leader to quit: Michael Foot, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband all stood down after their first defeat, although Neil Kinnock saw out two losses before resigning in 1992.

It’s possible, if unlikely, that Corbyn could become prime minister. If that prospect doesn’t materialise, however, the question is: will Corbyn follow the majority of his predecessors and resign, or will he hang on in office?

Will Corbyn stand down? The rules

There is no formal process for the parliamentary Labour party to oust its leader, as it discovered in the 2016 leadership challenge. Even after a majority of his MPs had voted no confidence in him, Corbyn stayed on, ultimately winning his second leadership contest after it was decided that the current leader should be automatically included on the ballot.

This year’s conference will vote on to reform the leadership selection process that would make it easier for a left-wing candidate to get on the ballot (nicknamed the “McDonnell amendment” by centrists): Corbyn could be waiting for this motion to pass before he resigns.

Will Corbyn stand down? The membership

Corbyn’s support in the membership is still strong. Without an equally compelling candidate to put before the party, Corbyn’s opponents in the PLP are unlikely to initiate another leadership battle they’re likely to lose.

That said, a general election loss could change that. Polling from March suggests that half of Labour members wanted Corbyn to stand down either immediately or before the general election.

Will Corbyn stand down? The rumours

Sources close to Corbyn have said that he might not stand down, even if he leads Labour to a crushing defeat this June. They mention Kinnock’s survival after the 1987 general election as a precedent (although at the 1987 election, Labour did gain seats).

Will Corbyn stand down? The verdict

Given his struggles to manage his own MPs and the example of other leaders, it would be remarkable if Corbyn did not stand down should Labour lose the general election. However, staying on after a vote of no-confidence in 2016 was also remarkable, and the mooted changes to the leadership election process give him a reason to hold on until September in order to secure a left-wing succession.

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