Why AV might not happen even if the vote is Yes

The Alternative Vote will only be used if the new boundaries are implemented.

Even if the Yes camp wins the electoral reform referendum, there's no guarantee that the Alternative Vote will be used at the next election. As the Electoral Commission's guide to the referendum points out, it depends on the successful completion of the boundary review.

The booklet notes:

The "alternative vote" system will be used after a review of the boundaries of the area that each MP represents (known as their constituency) is completed. This is due to happen between 2011 and 2013. The review will happen regardless of the outcome of this referendum.

At the end of the review, the UK parliament will vote on implementing the new boundaries. If the new boundaries are implemented, the "alternative vote" system will be used for all future elections to the House of Commons.

In other words, if, for whatever reason, the boundary review is not approved by parliament in time for the next election, the Alternative Vote will not be used.

The Electoral Commission press office confirmed that if there's an election between now and 2013, it will be fought under first-past-the-post.

Among other things, this provides the Lib Dems with a clear incentive to remain in the coalition until 2015.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.