The return of David Miliband

Former foreign secretary gives his first major interview since losing the Labour leadership to his b

Has David Miliband's rehabilitation programme begun in earnest? This morning on the BBC's Andrew Marr Show, he gave his first major broadcast interview since losing the Labour leadership election in September to his brother, Ed. Here are some highlights:

  • Asked about how relations were with his brother, Miliband replied gnomically: "Brothers are for life."
  • On remaining an MP: "I'm very committed to my constituency."
  • On what Ed Miliband has been saying about the "squeezed middle": "[It has] touched a chord."
  • On Labour's prospects: "We have to be economically credible." He noted, in this connection, that the French Socialists were considering choosing the current head of the IMF Dominique Strauss-Kahn as their presidential candidate next year.
  • Asked about Labour's record in office: "We must learn the right lessons of Labour in government." In other words, as he said throughout the leadership campaign, don't "trash" the record.
  • On the failure of the centre left across Europe: Miliband noted that there are centre-right governments in most of the major countries in the EU and said this is "in part because the economic terms of trade have changed. And in part because the right has got smart" and has moved on to the "centre ground".
  • On immigration: Miliband recommended that people read the recent Searchlight report on attitudes towards race and immigration in this country; he drew from it the conclusion that "immigration doesn't sit on its own", but must be understood alongside economic factors.

Jonathan Derbyshire is Managing Editor of Prospect. He was formerly Culture Editor of the New Statesman.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.