Libya war: in pictures

France, Britain and the US have led attacks on Libya’s army, airbases and other military targets.

Above, Libyan rebels walk past military vehicles belonging to Gaddafi's forces which were bombed by the French airforce in al-Wayfiyah.


Men examine the rubble after a missile totally destroyed an administrative building in Gaddafi's residence complex, Tripoli, 20 March 2011.


The building, which was about 50 metres (165 feet) from the tent where Gaddafi generally meets guests, was flattened.


A US F16 plane takes off from the Aviano Airbase last night. The US, UK and France targeted Libya with Tomahawk missiles and air strikes into the early hours of today. Gaddafi has declared the Mediterranean a "battlefield".


A gathering was called by the authorities at the Shati al-Hinshir cemetery in Tripoli, to mark the burial of people who they said were victims of attacks by western warplanes.


Gaddafi supporters shout slogans during a rally at the same cemetery.


Libyan rebels wave their flag on top of a wrecked tank belonging to Gaddafi's forces on the western entrance of Benghazi. The top US military commander Michael Mullen said the government's offensive on Benghazi has been stopped.

All photographs: AFP/Getty Images

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.