David Miliband refuses to rule out future leadership bid

Labour leadership runner-up tells local paper: “Who knows what will happen in the future?”

Discussing the Milibands recently with a Labour peer, I was told: "Things are terrible. They're no longer on speaking terms."

In an atmosphere of lingering resentment at Ed's leadership campaign, notably his (truthful) claim to have opposed the Iraq war, the two camps have struggled to evolve a modus vivendi. Meanwhile, David's supporters have constructed a fantasy in which their man returns to claim the crown from his treacherous brother.

With this in mind, the elder Milband's comments to the Journal are perfectly placed to keep the rumour mill churning.

He tells the local paper:

I have no plans to return to front-line politics – at the moment, that is. For now, I'm doing what's best for the party and leaving the field open for Ed to lead the party. I've got to admit I wish the leadership campaign had gone differently but who knows what will happen in the future?

For those increasingly suspicious of his political motives, David has a clear message: I'm not going anywhere.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Theresa May takes early lead in the Conservative leadership race

The first poll of the Tory contest puts the Home Secretary well out in front

Theresa May, the Home Secretary is well ahead among Conservative members according to a new YouGov poll for the Times

She is both the preferred first choice of a plurality of members from an open field (she secures 37 per cent of the vote, with her nearest rival, Boris Johnson, 10 points behind) and roundly trounces Johnson with 55 per cent to 38 per cent. In all other head-to-heads, Johnson wins comfortably.

Although YouGov have a patchy recent record in national contests - they predicted the London mayoral victory but failed to foresee the Conservative majority or the Brexit vote - they are four for four as far as internal party contests are concerned, having accurately predicted both the result and the final vote share of the 2015 and 2010 Labour leadership contests and the 2005 and 2001 Conservative contests. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.