Miliband suffers his first resignation

Eric Joyce resigns from the frontbench after being found guilty of drink-driving.

With all eyes on Lord Young, Ed Miliband's first frontbench resignation has received surprisingly little attention. Eric Joyce, who had been serving as shadow Northern Ireland minister, stepped down after being found guilty of drink-driving.

The former army major has had a more interesting political trajectory than most. For years he was one of the most hawkish Labour backbenchers and an outspoken supporter of the "war on terror" and the invasion of Iraq. But he resigned in 2009 as a parliamentary aide over the government's Afghanistan strategy, warning that the public would not accept for "much longer that our losses can be justified by simply referring to the risk of greater terrorism on our streets".

The fact that Joyce has resigned voluntarily means that there isn't much for the Tories to get their teeth into. But had it not been for Young and his "never had it so good" gaffe, one suspects that this affair would have been a lot more damaging for Labour.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

New Statesman
Show Hide image

Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.