Five must-read blogs for the US mid-term elections

Keep up to speed with the election events across the Atlantic with our pick of the web.

1. FiveThirtyEight

FiveThirtyEight says it aims to "cut through the clutter of this data-rich world", and it doesn't disappoint. Its beautifully clear maps and diagrams on politicians, polls, and predictions are accompanied by posts guiding you beyond the statistics to understand the underlying evidence. Essential reading.

2. Rasmussen Reports

Probably the most comprehensive coverage of US opinion polls, not only on the popularity of candidates, but citizens' views on almost anything. Crucial for understanding what the American public is thinking.

3. The Daily Beast's Election Oracle

The Election Oracle automatically gathers posts from across the internet and combines them with election poll data to build up what they claim are the most frequently updated predictions on the internet. Particularly interesting are the data on which candidates are winning the discussion on which issues across the internet.

4. The Huffington Post

America's leading liberal news website. Excellent insight into liberal American perspectives on the mid-terms.

5. Mark Mardell's America

Drawing on American culture and his own interviews, Mardell links the headlines and figures with human stories on the ground in the US. An interesting way to try to get inside the American psyche from a British perspective.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.