Ed Balls and civil liberties

What does this appointment show about Ed Miliband's commitment to a liberal approach?

The appointment of Ed Balls as shadow Home Secretary is remarkable and disappointing, for it appears only explicable in terms of Ed Miliband seeking to marginalise an internal party rival.

Last week I wrote that Miliband's leadership speech made the right noises about civil liberties and human rights.

But the first real test of this commitment seems to have been flunked. Balls voted strongly for ID cards and, as Education Secretary, promoted surveillance and database policies with far more enthusiasm than his job required.

One can see why Miliband wanted to keep Balls from the shadow chancellorship. One can also see why the success of Yvette Cooper required her to have one of the top shadow cabinet positions.

But this appointment -- on the basis of Balls' record to date -- does not indicate a serious commitment by the new Labour leader to reversing his party's post-2001 position as the illiberal party in UK politics.

Perhaps Balls will prove this indication wrong.

For there can be no doubt that the Coalition needs to be attacked from the left on a range of Home Office matters.

David Allen Green is a lawyer and writer. He blogs for the New Statesman on legal and policy matters.

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman and author of the Jack of Kent blog.

His legal journalism has included popularising the Simon Singh libel case and discrediting the Julian Assange myths about his extradition case.  His uncovering of the Nightjack email hack by the Times was described as "masterly analysis" by Lord Justice Leveson.

David is also a solicitor and was successful in the "Twitterjoketrial" appeal at the High Court.

(Nothing on this blog constitutes legal advice.)

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.