In praise of Steven Baxter

The blogger “Anton Vowl” reveals himself.

antonvowl twitter

While those in the mainstream media seem to think the political blogosphere consists entirely of Iain Dale and Guido Fawkes, many who follow blogs and blogging regard the lesser-known Anton Vowl as nothing less than outstanding.

His blog – formally called Enemies of Reason – is consistently provocative and well written. He is one of the few bloggers whose every post is not only worth reading, but also thinking about and reading again.

Like many other political bloggers, he posted under a pseudonym. But yesterday – in an interesting and moving article on the Guardian's Comment Is Free website – he "came out". No longer can we think of him only as his distinctive avatar, a toy monkey bought in Vietnam.

There was no need for him to "come out". However, as he has chosen to do so, it provides an opportunity to praise by name one of the very best writers today using the blogging medium: Steven Baxter.

David Allen Green blogs on legal and policy matters for the New Statesman. He has recently been appointed a judge for the 2011 George Orwell Prize for blogging, for which he was shortlisted in 2010.

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman and author of the Jack of Kent blog.

His legal journalism has included popularising the Simon Singh libel case and discrediting the Julian Assange myths about his extradition case.  His uncovering of the Nightjack email hack by the Times was described as "masterly analysis" by Lord Justice Leveson.

David is also a solicitor and was successful in the "Twitterjoketrial" appeal at the High Court.

(Nothing on this blog constitutes legal advice.)

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.