Clegg stakes everything on the coalition

Lib Dems won’t pull out if referendum is lost ++ Clegg claims party’s “identity crisis” would be wor

There's been much discussion of the impact that the electoral reform referendum will have on the future of the coalition, but Nick Clegg has just put a stop to speculation that the Lib Dems could walk away.

In a Radio 4 interview due to be broadcast this weekend, he suggests that his party would not quit the government even if the referendum is lost.

It's not altogether surprising that Clegg isn't willing to stake everything on the Alternative Vote, a system he once denounced as a "miserable little compromise". But his provocative comments -- he declares that the Lib Dems aren't "a sort of glorified form of the Electoral Reform Society" -- are likely to unsettle the party's grass roots further.

Then there's his dubious claim that the Lib Dems would be in an even worse position (YouGov's daily tracker has them on 14 per cent) if they hadn't formed a coalition with the Tories.

He adds that nobody would be taking "any notice" of the Lib Dems if they weren't in government, a rather harsh verdict on his party's pre-coalition existence. And he argues that his party's "identity crisis" would be far worse if it was in government with Labour.

That's a none-too-subtle rebuke to Simon Hughes, who claimed this week that a progressive alliance with Labour was still "on the agenda". It also sounds like a slightly hurt response to Ed Miliband's declaration, in his NS interview this week, that he would demand Clegg's resignation before doing any deal with the Liberal Democrats.

Clegg has now unambiguously staked his political future and that of his party on the coalition. Expect some serious dissent come conference season.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Exclusive: Labour MEPs call for Jeremy Corbyn to resign as leader

Letter demands Corbyn's departure and attacks his office for "promoting" the work of the Leave campaign. 

Labour's MEPs have called for Jeremy Corbyn to resign in the latest challenge to his leadership. In a letter sent to Corbyn and leaked to the New Statesman, Glenis Willmott, the chair of the European Parliamentary Labour Party (EPLP), wrote: "We find it hard to see how any Labour leader can continue in that role if they do not have the support of their MPs." Corbyn yesterday lost a no confidence vote among the Parliamentary Labour Party by 176 to 40. The letter also attacked the leader's office for an "official Labour briefing document" which "promoted the work of Kate Hoey and Gisela Stuart for the Leave campaign."

The demand for Corbyn's resignation is described by sources as the "majority position" of Labour's 20 MEPs. Their stance could prove crucial if the leader is not automatically included in any new contest (a matter of legal dispute) and is required to seek 50 nominations from MP/MEPs (20 per cent of the total). 

The letter reads: 

"The European Parliamentary Labour Party met today for its first meeting since the referendum and concluded that we should send you this letter today.

"The EPLP has always striven to have a loyal and constructive relationship with our party leader, and we have worked hard to cooperate with you over recent months. However, we have very serious concerns in the light of Labour's defeat in the referendum campaign.

"Responsiblity for the UK leaving the EU lies with David Cameron. That being said, we were simply astounded that on Friday morning, as news of the result sank in, an official Labour briefing document promoted the work of Kate Hoey and Gisela Stuart for the Leave campaign.

"Labour's loyal and dedicated teams of activists had just spent weeks on the doorstep and on street-stalls making the case to remain in the EU and countering leave campaign arguments. Yet you and your office authorised a briefing that put the whole Labour campaign on a par with two Labour politicians who had been appearing for weeks alongside right-wing politicians, such as Nigel Farage and Boris Johnson.

"Separate from the referendum issue, it has become clear in recent days that you do not have the confidence of the Parliamentary Labour Party. We find it hard to see how many Labour leader can continue in that role if they do not have the support of their MPs.

"So it it with a heavy heart that we urge you, for the sake of the Labour Party and for the people in our country who need a Labour government, to reconsider your position as Labour leader."

Yours sincerely,

Glenis Wilmott MEP

On behalf of the European Parliamentary Labour Party 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.