Gordon Brown’s resignation: the front pages

A selfless sacrifice, or an attempted coup? Here’s what the papers have to say on Brown’s surprise r

Financial Times: Brown to quit in bid to win over Lib Dems

ft front cover 

Guardian: Brown plays last card

guardian front page 

Telegraph: A very Labour coup

telegraph front cover 

Daily Mirror: For the greater Gord

daily mirror front cover 

Daily Mail: A squalid day for democracy

daily mail front cover 

Independent: The sacrifice

independent front cover 

The Times: His parting shot

the times front cover 

 

Get 12 issues for just £5.99 plus a free copy of "Liberty in the Age of Terror" by A C Grayling.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.