Election 2010 Lookahead: Thursday 29 April

The who, when and where of the campaign.

With only seven days to go until the closest election in recent times, here is what you should be looking out for today:


Steering clear of Rochdale, Cabinet Office Minister and Minister for London Tessa Jowell will speak at 'The Future of Cities in Britain' debate at the Sheikh Zayed Theatre at the New Academic Building in London (6.30pm), where she is joined by Conservative Party MP Bob Neill. However all eyes will be on her boss as he takes to the stage in what will be a crucial final leaders' debate (See below).


A quiet day for the Conservatives, with Cambo doubtless engaged in fervent preparation ahead of the kick-off tonight (8.30pm, See below).

Liberal Democrats

Nick Clegg continues to target the youth vote by taking part in a Q&A with students at a further education college ahead of the final leaders' debate in Birmingham. He will be joined by Lib Dem candidate for Birmingham Hall Green, Jerry Evans, for the event at South Birmingham College, Hall Green Campus (9.30am) The Liberal Democrats will also focus on setting out their policies for older people today. Mr Clegg will then travel to BBC studios for tonight's debate with David Cameron and Gordon Brown (See below).

Other parties

Unilever will bring a High Court case against the British National Party after the BNP used an image of its Marmite product on their website without permission in a campaign video. BNP party leader Nick Griffin expected to attend hearing at the Royal Courts of Justice in London (10am). The SNP will hold a press conference with party leader and Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond addressing economic policy at the Point Hotel in Edinburgh (1pm).

The media

Yes, it's that time of the week again - BBC One will host the third and final live televised debate between Gordon Brown, David Cameron, and Nick Clegg. This time the focus will be on the economy, with Mr Cameron delivering the first opening statement (8.30pm). Presenter David Dimbleby will then host a 'Question Time' debate with the panel including Children's Secretary Ed Balls, Liberal Democrat finance spokesman Vince Cable, and SNP leader Alex Salmond (10.45pm) on BBC One.

Away from the campaign

Ecologists are gathering at Wytham Woods near Oxford today today to celebrate the 60th anniversary of its designation as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), probably making it the most studied wood in Britain. The celebration includes the launch of a new book - 'Wytham Woods: Oxford's Ecological Laboratory.'

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.