Tebbit's daring blog debut

Tory peer praises Brown and attacks Cameron

A warm welcome to Norman Tebbit, who has just started blogging at the Telegraph. Tebbit's blog is likely to make uncomfortable reading for Conservative Central Office, and the Chingford skinhead takes just 118 words to launch a thinly veiled attack on David Cameron.

He writes:

Grittiness and the stiff upper lip seem to have been replaced with emotional incontinence, political correctness and open-necked shirts worn with well-cut suits.

And his contempt for Cameron (one feels he can't bear to mention him by name) is deliberately contrasted with his admiration for Gordon Brown. Of the Prime Minister, he says:

About the only leading politican to show any [grit] these days seems to be the much-abused Prime Minister Brown.

Like other conservatives (Rupert Murdoch and Paul Dacre among them), Tebbit respects and admires Brown for his intellect, his work ethic and his Presbyterian conscience.

Tebbit's appreciation for Brown is well established, but perhaps more surprising is his praise for Clement Attlee, the man who vanquished the Tory party in 1945 and oversaw the nationalisation of one-fifth of the economy.

Of Attlee, he laments: "Would that we had a leader of any party to compare with him."

Tebbit's political views still make me shudder, but if his blog continues to be this contrarian and independent-minded it's well worth bookmarking, I'd say.

 

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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.