David Cameron's airbrushed poster: part three

Labour HQ releases its own version as part of a new strategy

labour cameron

The poster, the poster, the poster. The poster just won't die.

It has a lot to do with this website, MyDavidCameron (click on it -- it's excellent), which has collated some of the best efforts at remodelling the Tory leader's 15-foot election poster, and provides a template that allows you to have your wicked way with it.

Childish? Perhaps. Funny? Definitely. Even Labour HQ has got in on the action, inspired by the viral success of this website and the plethora of sarcastic slogans sitting next to Cameron's eerily smooth face. (Here's a cracker: "I love the BBC so much, I want to cut it up into little pieces and give it to all my friends.")

In what is probably a slightly less controversial line of attack than the whole Eton thing, Gordon Brown went hard on the airbrushing today at PMQs. Some highlights:

"If you can't get your photo right, it's pretty difficult to get your policies right."

"He's getting even much redder than he is on his poster. What you see clearly is not what you get."

"His airbrushed poster had better lines on it than the lines he's giving today."

Labour's home page now features the party's very own version of the poster (see above). Possibly not as funny as the Elvis version (but then, I have a puerile sense of humour). Yet there's a serious point to be made here. James Kirkup, blogging at the Telegraph about Brown's comments, asks whether "Labour's strategists have decided that Mr Cameron's I-am-the-message campaign is vulnerable".

The presidential-style poster was, presumably, a response to the fact that the Cameron brand consistently leads over the Conservative one. The obvious airbrushing provides, for the opposition, a useful political metaphor for dissembling, concealing the truth. It will be interesting to see whether this line of attack has any real impact on voters.

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Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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