Spiritualism and the eternal life

A way of life, not a strange cult, that lets us understand our true spiritual nature

Spiritualism is not as is commonly believed, a strange cult meeting in darkened rooms to 'call up the dead', but an officially recognised religious movement with its own churches and Ministers who possess the same rights and privileges as other religions.

Unlike most other major religions, Spiritualism does not tie individuals to a creed or dogma. We have Seven Principles which act as guidelines for the development of a personal philosophy of how to live one’s life:

1. The Fatherhood of God
2. The Brotherhood of Man
3. The Communion of Spirits and the Ministry of Angels
4. The continuous existence of the human soul
5. Personal responsibility
6. Compensation and retribution for all good and evil deeds done on earth
7. Eternal progress open to every human soul

Spiritualism is a religion that embodies the main ideas of all religions. We believe in the existence of God and that there is a life after death. In our churches you find people from all religions and all walks of life, we do not demand that they ‘convert’ rather that they find their own way to God and Spirit within their own understanding and supported by the church.

There are more than 350 SNU churches across the UK who are organised and administered by the Spiritualists National Union.

We work to promote spirituality, to stimulate spiritual growth and foster understanding.
Spiritualism is also a science, it is based upon well proven facts that can be demonstrated and scientifically classified. Spiritualism promotes the search for truth in every department of existence, in nature and in human psychology, and is therefore the science of life. We are constantly researching, studying and exploring how to measure, improve and develop further our abilities.
Spiritualism is a philosophy as it attempts to understand man and the universe in all their varied relations, physical, intellectual, moral, and spiritual. Our philosophy is not based upon one book but rather from varied resources and disciplines.

The difference between Spiritualism and other religions is the ability through Mediumship to prove that the human spirit survives death. Our services are taken by Spiritualist Mediums, who are individuals, able to communicate with those who have died, and provide conclusive evidence of their continued existence in the Spirit World to their families and loved ones here. During the service the Medium speaks inspirationally about philosophy and its connotations upon mankind, much as a vicar would give the sermon.

We also have Healing Mediums who are able to attune to the spiritual energies and give hands on healing to individuals to compliment the healing process in mind, body and spirit. Mediums are highly sensitive people who have developed their spiritual and psychic abilities – which each one of us possesses to a greater or less degree – women’s intuition is an example. Some are born mediums, others take years to develop. As each person is an individual we each approach our own spiritual development in our own way, supported by teaching mediums, church development groups and circles, which guide us through the process of unfolding our abilities and enable us to discover our potential.

There are education courses available to allow further insight and learning and we have the Arthur Findlay College based in Stansted which holds residential courses for anyone to attend in order to learn more about the many aspects of Spiritualism.

It is a way of life and provides the individual with an understanding of their own spiritual nature and the way in which they relate to God, the Universe and Spirit.

Libby Clark is an Officiant of the Spiritualists National Union who has been a working Spiritualist Medium for 30 years. She is a Course Organiser / Tutor at the Arthur Findlay College, and works worldwide as a Spiritualist medium, teacher, healer, trance healer. www.libbyclark.biz
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Voters are turning against Brexit but the Lib Dems aren't benefiting

Labour's pro-Brexit stance is not preventing it from winning the support of Remainers. Will that change?

More than a year after the UK voted for Brexit, there has been little sign of buyer's remorse. The public, including around a third of Remainers, are largely of the view that the government should "get on with it".

But as real wages are squeezed (owing to the Brexit-linked inflationary spike) there are tentative signs that the mood is changing. In the event of a second referendum, an Opinium/Observer poll found, 47 per cent would vote Remain, compared to 44 per cent for Leave. Support for a repeat vote is also increasing. Forty one per cent of the public now favour a second referendum (with 48 per cent opposed), compared to 33 per cent last December. 

The Liberal Democrats have made halting Brexit their raison d'être. But as public opinion turns, there is no sign they are benefiting. Since the election, Vince Cable's party has yet to exceed single figures in the polls, scoring a lowly 6 per cent in the Opinium survey (down from 7.4 per cent at the election). 

What accounts for this disparity? After their near-extinction in 2015, the Lib Dems remain either toxic or irrelevant to many voters. Labour, by contrast, despite its pro-Brexit stance, has hoovered up Remainers (55 per cent back Jeremy Corbyn's party). 

In some cases, this reflects voters' other priorities. Remainers are prepared to support Labour on account of the party's stances on austerity, housing and education. Corbyn, meanwhile, is a eurosceptic whose internationalism and pro-migration reputation endear him to EU supporters. Other Remainers rewarded Labour MPs who voted against Article 50, rebelling against the leadership's stance. 

But the trend also partly reflects ignorance. By saying little on the subject of Brexit, Corbyn and Labour allowed Remainers to assume the best. Though there is little evidence that voters will abandon Corbyn over his EU stance, the potential exists.

For this reason, the proposal of a new party will continue to recur. By challenging Labour over Brexit, without the toxicity of Lib Dems, it would sharpen the choice before voters. Though it would not win an election, a new party could force Corbyn to soften his stance on Brexit or to offer a second referendum (mirroring Ukip's effect on the Conservatives).

The greatest problem for the project is that it lacks support where it counts: among MPs. For reasons of tribalism and strategy, there is no emergent "Gang of Four" ready to helm a new party. In the absence of a new convulsion, the UK may turn against Brexit without the anti-Brexiteers benefiting. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.