Liz Earle Cleanse and Polish Hot Cloth Cleanser

Skin is left feeling soft, clean but never dry. The plastic pump bottle is great for travel

Price: £12.25 for the 100ml starter kit with two cloths; 100ml on its own, £10.75, travel size, 30ml: £4.50

Muslin cloths also sold separately, £3 for a pack of two, £7.50 for a pack of six.

Stockists: www.lizearle.com Customer centre - 01983 813 913

Launched: 8th March 1996

Tested: 2004 and January 2008

One of the best cleansers there is. I love it. You use it in three stages: massage it all over face, even your eyes. It cleanses your face of dirt and make up. Massage is very good for the skin and it’s almost impossible to overdo if you just use your own fingers (i.e. no brushes or other scrubby devices). Then you rinse out the linen face cloth that comes with the cleanser in hand hot water and use it to remove the product – that’s your exfoliation done. Then you splash with cool water. This last bit is the only bit I disagree with in that I wouldn’t, personally, change the temperature of the water because I think it can lead to broken veins if you’re a bit sensitive. But it’s up to you. The cool water feels nice. Skin is left feeling soft, clean but never dry. The plastic pump bottle is great for travel.

Ingredients:

Aqua
Caprylic / capric triglyceride
Theobroma cacao (cocoa) seed butter
Cetearyl alcohol
Cettyl esters
Sorbitan stearate
Polysorbate 60
Glycerine
Cera alba (beeswax)
Propylene glycol
Humulus lupulus(hops) extract
Panthenol
Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) extract
Anthemis nobilis (chamomile) extract
Prunus amygdalus dulcis (sweet almond) extract
Eucalyptus globules (eucalyptus) oil
Limonene
Citric acid
Sodium hydroxide
Phenoxyethanol
Benzoic acid
Ethylhexylglycerin
Dehydroacetic acid
Polyaminopropyl biguanide

Annalisa Barbieri was in fashion PR for five years before going to the Observer to be fashion assistant. She has worked for the Evening Standard and the Times and was one of the fashion editors on the Independent on Sunday for five years, where she wrote the Dear Annie column. She was fishing correspondent of the Independent from 1997-2004.
Getty
Show Hide image

We're running out of time to stop a hard Brexit - and the consequences are terrifying

Liam Fox has nothing to say and Labour has thrown the towel in. 

Another day goes past, and still we’re no clearer to finding out what Brexit really means. Today secretary of state for international trade, Liam Fox, was expected to use a speech to the World Trade Organisation to announce that the UK is on course to leave the EU’s single market, as reported earlier this week. But in a humiliating climb-down, he ended up saying very little at all except for vague platitudes about the UK being in favour of free trade.

At a moment when the business community is desperate for details about our future trading arrangements, the International Trade Secretary is saying one thing to the papers and another to our economic partners abroad. Not content with insulting British businesses by calling them fat and lazy, it seems Fox now wants to confuse them as well.

The Tory Government’s failure to spell out what Brexit really means is deeply damaging for our economy, jobs and global reputation. British industry is crying out for direction and for certainty about what lies ahead. Manufacturers and small businesses who rely on trade with Europe want to know whether Britain’s membership of the single market will be preserved. EU citizens living in Britain and all the UK nationals living in Europe want to know whether their right to free movement will be secured. But instead we have endless dithering from Theresa May and bitter divisions between the leading Brexiteers.

Meanwhile the Labour party appears to have thrown in the towel on Europe. This week, Labour chose not to even debate Brexit at their conference, while John McDonnell appeared to confirm he will not fight for Britain’s membership of the single market. And the re-election of Jeremy Corbyn, who hardly lifted a finger to keep us in Europe during the referendum, confirms the party is not set to change course any time soon.

That is not good enough. It’s clear a hard Brexit would hit the most deprived parts of Britain the hardest, decimating manufacturing in sectors like the car industry on which so many skilled jobs rely. The approach of the diehard eurosceptics would mean years of damaging uncertainty and barriers to trade with our biggest trading partners. While the likes of Liam Fox and boris Johnson would be busy travelling the world cobbling together trade deals from scratch, it would be communities back home who pay the price.

We are running out of time to stop a hard Brexit. Britain needs a strong, united opposition to this Tory Brexit Government, one that will fight for our membership of the single market and the jobs that depend on it. If Labour doesn’t fill this gap, the Liberal Democrats will.

Tim Farron is leader of the Liberal Democrats.